Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New Understanding of Protein’s Role in Brain

29.03.2010
How do we process thoughts and store memories? A team of researchers headed by Dr. Nahum Sonenberg of McGill’s Department of Biochemistry and Goodman Cancer Centre has discovered that brains in mammals modify a particular protein in a unique way, which alters the protein’s normal function. This discovery represents an important step in understanding how our brains work.

When our memories are being formed, nerve cells, or neurons, communicate with each other through electrical impulses at specialized connections. To strengthen these connections, the neurons require new proteins – key molecules needed for all forms of cellular activity. The protein in question, 4E-BP2, controls the process of producing new proteins in the nervous system.

This process, known as protein synthesis or translation, is the major focus of research in Sonenberg’s laboratory. Before the team’s discovery, no one knew 4E-BP2 could be chemically altered in such a manner as the team described in its work, much less that this could have an effect on neuron function.

According to the lead researcher Dr. Michael Bidinosti, a recent graduate from Sonenberg’s laboratory, “we found a modification to a protein that controls the cellular protein-synthesis machinery. This modification seems to affect the ability of nerve cells to communicate with each other and is thought to be part of the processes underlying memory.”

He explains that study of protein synthesis and of memory are increasingly converging fields, and that the team’s research is an important achievement in this arena. Collaboration was critical to the discovery as the team includes researchers from the Université de Montréal, the Montreal Neurological Institute, the University of Toronto, Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, and the University of Bergen in Norway.

“Better understanding of protein synthesis in the brain is crucial to the advancement of neuroscience, particularly as researchers discover that altered proteins may have a direct impact on the memory process,” says Dr. Anthony Phillips, Scientific Director of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Institute of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Addiction. “CIHR hopes that these new findings will lead to more research aimed at ultimately solving memory loss issues.”

The research was published in the journal Molecular Cell on March 25, 2010, and was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Bidinosti was supported by a Postgraduate Doctoral Scholarship from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

On the Web: www.medicine.mcgill.ca/nahum/

French version:
Vers une meilleure compréhension du fonctionnement du cerveau
Des chercheurs découvrent le rôle clé d’une certaine protéine dans le processus mnémonique

Comment protégeons-nous la pensée et enregistrons-nous les souvenirs? Sous la direction de Nahum Sonenberg, professeur au Département de biochimie de l’Université McGill et rattaché au Centre de recherche sur le cancer Goodman, une équipe de chercheurs a découvert que le cerveau des mammifères modifie une protéine particulière d’une façon unique, ce qui, en retour, transforme la fonction normale du cerveau. Cette découverte représente une étape importante quant à la compréhension du fonctionnement du cerveau.

Au cours de la formation des souvenirs, les cellules nerveuses – ou neurones – communiquent les unes avec les autres par le biais d’impulsions électriques à un embranchement ciblé. Pour consolider ces embranchements, les neurones doivent puiser dans de nouvelles protéines : des molécules clés nécessaires à la formation de toute activité cellulaire. La protéine en question, 4E-BP2, contrôle le processus permettant la production de nouvelles protéines dans le système nerveux.

Connu sous le nom de protéinogénèse ou de traduction protéique, ce processus est le principal point d’intérêt des travaux de recherche menés par l’équipe du professeur Sonenberg. Avant cette découverte, nul ne savait que le gène 4E-BP2 pouvait subir une telle modification chimique, ni que cette dernière pouvait avoir une incidence sur la fonction neuronale.

« Nous avons découvert une modification à une protéine qui exerce un contrôle sur l’appareil de protéogénèse cellulaire. Cette modification semble avoir une incidence sur la capacité des cellules nerveuses à communiquer entre elles. Cette capacité semble faire partie des processus sous-jacents à la mémoire », de préciser Michael Bidinosti, doctorant rattaché au laboratoire du professeur Sonenberg jusqu’à récemment.

Monsieur Bidinosti explique que, de plus en plus, l’étude de la protéinogénèse et l’étude de la mémoire sont des domaines qui tendent à converger. Dans cette perspective, les travaux menés sous la direction de Nahum Sonenberg permettent la réalisation de percées spectaculaires dans ce champ d’études. Les collaborations nouées ont été essentielles à l’aboutissement de cette découverte et les chercheurs qui y ont pris part sont notamment rattachés à l’Université de Montréal, à l’Institut neurologique de Montréal, à l’Université de Toronto, au Collège de médecine Baylor de Houston et à l’Université de Bergen en Norvège.

« Une meilleure compréhension de la protéinogénèse cérébrale est essentielle à l’avancement de la neuroscience, et cela est particulièrement vrai alors que les chercheurs découvrent qu’il est possible que les protéines modifiées aient un impact direct sur le processus mnémonique. Les Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada espèrent que ces nouvelles données mèneront à la réalisation de recherches plus poussées, lesquelles permettront ultimement de résoudre les problèmes liés à l’amnésie », a précisé le docteur Anthony Phillips, directeur scientifique de l’Institut des neurosciences, de la santé mentale et des toxicomanies des Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada.

Financée par les Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada et l’Institut médical Howard Hughes, les résultats de cette étude ont été publiés dans le journal Molecular Cell le 25 mars 2010. Les travaux menés par Michael Bidinosti ont été financés à l’aide d’une bourse de recherche doctorale octroyée par le Conseil de recherches en sciences naturelles et en génie.

Internet : www.medicine.mcgill.ca/nahum/

William Raillant-Clark | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.medicine.mcgill.ca/nahum/

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Cancer diagnosis: no more needles?
25.05.2018 | Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel

nachricht Less is more? Gene switch for healthy aging found
25.05.2018 | Leibniz-Institut für Alternsforschung - Fritz-Lipmann-Institut e.V. (FLI)

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Powerful IT security for the car of the future – research alliance develops new approaches

The more electronics steer, accelerate and brake cars, the more important it is to protect them against cyber-attacks. That is why 15 partners from industry and academia will work together over the next three years on new approaches to IT security in self-driving cars. The joint project goes by the name Security For Connected, Autonomous Cars (SecForCARs) and has funding of €7.2 million from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. Infineon is leading the project.

Vehicles already offer diverse communication interfaces and more and more automated functions, such as distance and lane-keeping assist systems. At the same...

Im Focus: Molecular switch will facilitate the development of pioneering electro-optical devices

A research team led by physicists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed molecular nanoswitches that can be toggled between two structurally different states using an applied voltage. They can serve as the basis for a pioneering class of devices that could replace silicon-based components with organic molecules.

The development of new electronic technologies drives the incessant reduction of functional component sizes. In the context of an international collaborative...

Im Focus: LZH showcases laser material processing of tomorrow at the LASYS 2018

At the LASYS 2018, from June 5th to 7th, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) will be showcasing processes for the laser material processing of tomorrow in hall 4 at stand 4E75. With blown bomb shells the LZH will present first results of a research project on civil security.

At this year's LASYS, the LZH will exhibit light-based processes such as cutting, welding, ablation and structuring as well as additive manufacturing for...

Im Focus: Self-illuminating pixels for a new display generation

There are videos on the internet that can make one marvel at technology. For example, a smartphone is casually bent around the arm or a thin-film display is rolled in all directions and with almost every diameter. From the user's point of view, this looks fantastic. From a professional point of view, however, the question arises: Is that already possible?

At Display Week 2018, scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP will be demonstrating today’s technological possibilities and...

Im Focus: Explanation for puzzling quantum oscillations has been found

So-called quantum many-body scars allow quantum systems to stay out of equilibrium much longer, explaining experiment | Study published in Nature Physics

Recently, researchers from Harvard and MIT succeeded in trapping a record 53 atoms and individually controlling their quantum state, realizing what is called a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

In focus: Climate adapted plants

25.05.2018 | Event News

Save the date: Forum European Neuroscience – 07-11 July 2018 in Berlin, Germany

02.05.2018 | Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

In focus: Climate adapted plants

25.05.2018 | Event News

Flow probes from the 3D printer

25.05.2018 | Machine Engineering

Less is more? Gene switch for healthy aging found

25.05.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>