Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Ultrafruits - dried by sound

01.09.2010
Cost-effective and energy-efficient: In the ULTRAVEG project funded by the EU, a system has been developed which can improve drying rates and lower energy consumption during the dehydration process of dried products. And their taste? As good as in conventional production.

Development of a High Power Ultrasound system for low-cost, effective and top-quality drying of fruits and vegetables

Dried foods are popular, healthy, and offer many advantages for the mass production of food - not least cheaper transportation costs, longer storage life and ease of use. However, modern drying methods prove costly, time-consuming, and labour/energy-intensive. There is therefore a need to provide SMEs in the dried food sector in the EU with a technology which will help them to remain competitive in the global market. New technologies are needed which can significantly reduce drying time and save energy costs. The ULTRAVEG project focuses on the development of a High Power Ultrasound system for low-cost, effective and top-quality drying of fruits and vegetables.

During its final meeting on 31st August 2010, hosted by Gefriertrocknung Greven GmbH, Germany, one of the project partners, the ULTRAVEG consortium demonstrated its achievements to industry and the press. ULTRAVEG has shown very promising results which can move the current state of the art in food drying to a new level.

On the basis of scientific work and process development carried out at the Department of Food Biotechnology and Food Process Engineering of the Technische Universität Berlin, two ULTRAVEG prototypes have been built by Innovació i Recerca Industrial i Sostenible, Spain, and tested for use during conventional drying processes. At ttz Bremerhaven, a combination of hot dry air and ultrasound has been tested in a chamber. Additionally, ttz Bremerhaven performed sensory evaluation tests with the processed goods and analysed them chemically. Development work has not yet been fully completed and the technology will be further improved and adapted for use on a larger scale. It can however be concluded that the future uptake of the technology within the dried food industry will benefit European competitiveness and innovation, employment, the environment, and consumers at large.

High Power Ultrasound (HPU) for the dehydration of porous materials seems to be very effective in processes in which heat-sensitive materials such as foodstuffs must be treated. HPU is a safe and environmentally friendly, efficient and economical technology. High-intensity ultrasonic vibrations are capable of affecting mass transfer processes with the result that the drying rate of materials is increased, thus allowing lower temperatures or shorter treatment times. Since it is not a replacement for current drying techniques, the ULTRAVEG system is designed in such a way that it can readily be used in conjunction with existing drying processes. "This gives especially small and medium-sized companies the opportunity to implement the new technology at moderate costs. It is very important for us to see our research results actually being used in real-life business", said Claudia Krines, R&D Director of the Food Technology Department at ttz Bremerhaven.

ULTRAVEG is jointly coordinated by GÖKSER Makina Sanayi Ticaret LTD STI, a Turkish SME, and Innovació i Recerca Industrial i Sostenible, a research organisation in Spain. It is a two-year, industry-driven research and development project that is being funded by the European Commission’s Seventh Framework Programme. Apart from GÖKSER, the participating SMEs are:

Fullwell Mill Ltd., which is a UK-based company established in 1992 that has been involved in the processing and manufacturing of a wide range of organic, fair trade and health foods, including dried foods and snacks.

Gefriertrocknung Greven GmbH, which was established in 2001 in Germany and is providing dried fruits, herbs and vegetables to the food-processing industry.

Aktive Arc Sarl, which is a supplier of consulting services and equip-ment in the field of new and innovative ultrasonic technologies.

HEBOLD Mixing and More GmbH, which was established in 1925 in Germany and specialises in the manufacture of machinery, dryers, mixing plants, batch mixers, continuous mixers, heat exchangers and valves for the food and pharmaceutical industries.

The RTD performers in ULTRAVEG are the Department of Food Biotechnology and Process Engineering of the Technische Universität Berlin, Germany, Innovació i Recerca Industrial i Sostenible from Spain, and ttz Bremerhaven, Germany.

For more information visit www.ultraveg.eu

ttz Bremerhaven is an innovative provider of research services and oper-ates in the field of application-oriented research and development. Under the umbrella of ttz Bremerhaven, an international team of experts is working in the areas of food, environment, health and consulting services.

Contact:
Christian Colmer
Head of Communication and Media
ttz Bremerhaven
Fischkai 1
D-27572 Bremerhaven (Germany)
Phone: +49 (0)471 48 32 -124
Fax: +49 (0)471 48 32 - 129
ccolmer@ttz-bremerhaven.de

Christian Colmer | idw
Further information:
http://www.ttz-bremerhaven.de

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity
22.09.2017 | DFG-Forschungszentrum für Regenerative Therapien TU Dresden

nachricht The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet
22.09.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Biochemie

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet

Plants and algae use the enzyme Rubisco to fix carbon dioxide, removing it from the atmosphere and converting it into biomass. Algae have figured out a way to increase the efficiency of carbon fixation. They gather most of their Rubisco into a ball-shaped microcompartment called the pyrenoid, which they flood with a high local concentration of carbon dioxide. A team of scientists at Princeton University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University and the Max Plank Institute of Biochemistry have unravelled the mysteries of how the pyrenoid is assembled. These insights can help to engineer crops that remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing more food.

A warming planet

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity

22.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Penn first in world to treat patient with new radiation technology

22.09.2017 | Medical Engineering

Calculating quietness

22.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>