Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Toward Methuselah – Long-Living Lighting Devices

09.03.2015

Researchers at the Universities of Basel and Valencia have reported important advances in the development of next generation lighting technologies in the journal “Chemical Science”.

Lighting technology is in a state of change. The old-fashioned light-bulb, which was more efficient at converting electricity into heat than light, is currently being replaced by fluorescent devices and it is expected that light emitting diodes (LEDs) will be the technology of choice in the mid-term future.


The iridium metal center is wrapped in an organic coat which protects it in the LEC.

© University of Basel

The research group lead by Basel professors Catherine E. Housecroft and Edwin C. Constable describes the design of new molecular components and strategies for the preparation of light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) with remarkable lifetimes.

Simpler and less demanding LECs

LEDs have the disadvantage that they are complex, multilayered devices that require high-vacuum and high temperature techniques for their preparation. They also need to be rigorously protected from exposure to air or water. LECs are much simpler devices, comprising only one layer of active material, which can be solution-processed in ambient conditions.

To date, LEC devices have had relatively short lifetimes which have precluded serious commercial investigation. The Basel and Valencia teams have shown that devices with lifetimes exceeding 2500 hours can now be prepared using molecular components stabilized by so-called aromatic rings.

The team has built metal complexes decorated with rings that arrange themselves to form a shell around the molecule. “It is a little bit like a flower closing up at night – the flat, petal-like rings fold up about the metal to make a compact and robust structure”, says Constable.

These supramolecular interactions make the complexes exceptionally stable. Furthermore, molecular tuning of the components allows a tuning of the color of light emitted, bringing the goal of white-light emitting devices one step closer.

Original source
Andreas M. Bünzli, Edwin C. Constable, Catherine E. Housecroft, Alessandro Prescimone, Jennifer A. Zampese, Giulia Longo, Lidón Gil-Escrig, Antonio Pertegás, Enrique Ortí and Henk J. Bolink
Exceptionally long-lived light-emitting electrochemical cells: multiple intra-cation π-stacking interactions in [Ir(C^N)2(N^N)][PF6] emitters
Chem. Sci., 2015, 1-10 | doi: 10.1039/c4sc03942d

Further information
Edwin C. Constable, Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Tel. +41 61 267 10 01, Email: edwin.constable@unibas.ch
Catherine E. Housecroft, Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Tel. +41 61 267 10 08, Email: catherine.housecroft@unibas.ch

Weitere Informationen:

https://www.unibas.ch/en/News-Events/News/Uni-Research/Long-Living-Lighting-Devi...

Olivia Poisson | Universität Basel
Further information:
http://www.unibas.ch

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Newly designed molecule binds nitrogen
23.02.2018 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Atomic Design by Water
23.02.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Attoseconds break into atomic interior

A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. This has made it possible to observe the interaction of multiple photons in a single such pulse with electrons in the inner orbital shell of an atom.

In order to observe the ultrafast electron motion in the inner shells of atoms with short light pulses, the pulses must not only be ultrashort, but very...

Im Focus: Good vibrations feel the force

A group of researchers led by Andrea Cavalleri at the Max Planck Institute for Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) in Hamburg has demonstrated a new method enabling precise measurements of the interatomic forces that hold crystalline solids together. The paper Probing the Interatomic Potential of Solids by Strong-Field Nonlinear Phononics, published online in Nature, explains how a terahertz-frequency laser pulse can drive very large deformations of the crystal.

By measuring the highly unusual atomic trajectories under extreme electromagnetic transients, the MPSD group could reconstruct how rigid the atomic bonds are...

Im Focus: Developing reliable quantum computers

International research team makes important step on the path to solving certification problems

Quantum computers may one day solve algorithmic problems which even the biggest supercomputers today can’t manage. But how do you test a quantum computer to...

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Basque researchers turn light upside down

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Finnish research group discovers a new immune system regulator

23.02.2018 | Health and Medicine

Attoseconds break into atomic interior

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>