Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New technique transforms iPS cells into natural tumor killers

02.06.2010
A technique for producing natural killer T (NKT) cells, known for their role in suppressing tumor growth, has been successfully demonstrated for the first time using induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. The technique opens the door to effective new cell-targeted treatments for cancer.

A technique for producing natural killer T (NKT) cells, known for their role in suppressing tumor growth, has been successfully demonstrated for the first time using induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Developed by researchers at RIKEN, Japan’s flagship research institution, the technique opens the door to effective new cell-targeted treatments for cancer.

Through their production of TH1 cytokines, NKT cells play an essential role in innate immune responses, protecting against tumors and virus-infected cells. Yet while clinical trials have shown that injection of the glycolipid á-GalCer can effectively activate an NKT cell antitumor response, most cancer patients have very few NKT cells, which has prevented the wider application of this therapy.

Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, “all-purpose” cells capable of differentiating into any type of cell, present a potential solution to this shortage of NKT cells, but with a catch: in lymphocytes, rearrangement of genes during differentiation drastically diminishes the effectiveness of conventional iPS cell generation techniques, resulting in only a small portion of cells with the desired antitumor function.

To overcome this problem, the research team used mature NKT cells that had already undergone gene rearrangement to derive their iPS cells. As reported in the July issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, these iPS cells enabled them to generate large numbers of NKT cells that secrete abundant IFN-ã, a TH1 cytokine that activates antitumor functions. When tested using a mouse model, the cells successfully reproduced the effects of natural NKT cells and suppressed tumor growth, validating the approach and setting the stage for powerful clinical applications in cancer therapy.

For more information, please contact:

Dr. Hiroshi Watarai
Laboratory for Immune Regulation
RIKEN Research Center for Allergy and Immunology
Tel: +81-(0)45-503-7008 / Fax: +81-(0)45-503-7006
Dr. Haruhiko Koseki
Laboratory for Developmental Genetics
RIKEN Research Center for Allergy and Immunology
Tel: +81-(0)45-503-9689 / Fax: +81-(0)45-503-9688
Ms. Tomoko Ikawa (PI officer)
Global Relations Office
RIKEN
Tel: +81-(0)48-462-1225 / Fax: +81-(0)48-462-4715
Email: koho@riken.jp

gro-pr | Research asia research news
Further information:
http://www.riken.jp
http://www.researchsea.com

Further reports about: NKT NKT cells TH1 cell-targeted treatments iPS cells pluripotent stem tumor growth

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Topologische Quantenchemie
21.07.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe

nachricht Topological Quantum Chemistry
21.07.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Ultrathin device harvests electricity from human motion

24.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Scientists announce the quest for high-index materials

24.07.2017 | Materials Sciences

ADIR Project: Lasers Recover Valuable Materials

24.07.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>