Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Taking tissue regeneration beyond state-of-the-art

06.06.2014

Researchers in the United Kingdom and Malaysia are developing a new class of injectable material that stimulates stem cells to regenerate damaged tissue and form new blood vessels, heart and bone tissue.


Their aim is to produce radical new treatments that will reduce the need for invasive surgery, optimise recovery and reduce the risk of undesirable scar tissue.

The research, which brings together expertise at the University of Nottingham and its Malaysia Campus (UNMC), is part of the “Rational Bioactive Materials Design for Tissue Generation” or “Biodesign” project – an €11m EU-funded initiative involving 21 research teams from across Europe.

“This research heralds a step-change in approaches to tissue regeneration,” says Professor Kevin Shakesheff, Head of the School of Pharmacy at the University of Nottingham's UK campus.

“Current biomaterials are poorly suited to the needs of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Our aim is to develop new materials and medicines that will stimulate tissue regeneration rather than wait for the body to start the process itself.”

UNMC is building on its expertise in nanotechnology for drug delivery. “Here in Malaysia we are looking at synthesising microparticles that can be injected directly into a patient at the site of injury to promote tissue re-growth,” says Professor Andrew Morris, an expert in transdermal drug delivery and Head of the School of Pharmacy (UNMC). “These microparticles would act as a scaffold to encourage regrowth in bone tissue, skeletal muscle and potentially even cardiac muscle.”

This research is going to have a significant impact on patients,” says Dr. Nashiru Billa who is the Associate Dean for Research in the Faculty of Science. “In future, you could include anti-cancer drugs in the delivery system that would not only lead to the growth of the tissue but would also help kill cancer cells within the bone tissue.”

For more information contact:
Josephine Dionisappu
PR & Communications Manager
Tel: +60 (03) 8924 8746

or
Dr. Nashiru Billa
Tel: +60 (03) 8924 8211.

Notes to editors:
The University of Nottingham has 43,000 students and is ‘the nearest Britain has to a truly global university, with campuses in China and Malaysia  modelled on a headquarters that is among the most attractive in Britain’ (Times Good University Guide 2014). It is also the most popular university in the UK among graduate employers, one of the  world’s greenest universities, and winner of the Times Higher Education Award for ‘Outstanding Contribution to Sustainable Development’. It is ranked in the World’s Top 75 universities by the QS World University Rankings.

Josephine Dionisappu | Research SEA News
Further information:
http://www.nottingham.edu.my/index.aspx
http://www.researchsea.com

Further reports about: Malaysia Pharmacy UNMC injury microparticles state-of-the-art tissue treatments

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht From Termite Fumigant to Molecular Coupling
01.09.2014 | Angewandte Chemie International Edition

nachricht Tilapia fish: Ready for mating at the right time
01.09.2014 | Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Jena

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

IT security in the digital society

27.08.2014 | Event News

Understanding the brain—neuroscientists meet in Göttingen

27.08.2014 | Event News

MEDICA EDUCATION CONFERENCE: Bessere Behandlung dank Biomarker

21.08.2014 | Event News

 
Latest News

Endangered Siamese Crocs Released in Wild

01.09.2014 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

Doing More with Less: New Technique Uses Fraction of Measurements to Efficiently Find Quantum Wave Functions

01.09.2014 | Physics and Astronomy

Simpler Process to Grow Germanium Nanowires Could Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries

01.09.2014 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>