Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Sugar Coating Reveals Black Death

18.07.2013
Plague detection through anti-carbohydrate antibodies

Even today, the lives of humans and animals are claimed by plague. A new antibody-based detection method can be used to reliably and sensitively identify plague in patient serum and other biological samples.

The antibody specifically recognizes a particular carbohydrate structure found on the cell surfaces of the bacterium that causes plague, as reported by German researchers in the journal Angewandte Chemie.

“Black death” took the lives of over 200 million humans over the course of three pandemics in the last 1500 years. More recently, cases of plague have been detected in Africa and Asia. Because of the high danger of transmission and the severity of the infection, Yersinia pestis, the pathogen behind the plague, is classified as a category A biological weapon. When inhaled as an aerosol it causes pneumonic plague, which usually results in death if it is not treated fast. Rapid and reliable diagnosis is thus critical.

“Currently, Y. pestis is detected by polymerase chain reaction based assays or traditional phenotyping,” explains Peter Seeberger of the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces in Potsdam. “These methods of detection are reliable, but they are also often complex, expensive, and slow.”

The recognition of surface proteins by antibodies is a highly promising and less complicated alternative method for the detection of plague, but it has a high failure rate and low selectivity with regard to related strains of bacteria.

Seeberger and his team have now found a way around this problem: Gram-negative bacteria like Y. pestis have molecules called lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), made of fat and carbohydrate components, on their outer cell membranes. “The inner core of the Yersinia LPS has a unique structure that differs from that of other Gram-negative bacteria,” says Seeberger. “This could be a suitable region for detection by means of specific antibodies for rapid point-of-care diagnosis.”

Because isolation of Y. pestis LPS is a laborious undertaking, the researchers chose to synthetically produce one typical motif from the molecule, a segment consisting of three sugar molecules, each of which has a framework of seven carbon atoms. The researchers attached these segments, called triheptoses, to diphtherietoxoid CRM197, which acts as a carrier protein. This protein is a typical component of licensed vaccine formulations and triggers the formation of antibodies. The researchers immunized mice and isolated antibodies from their blood.

Various immunoassays demonstrated that the resulting antibodies detect the plague pathogen with high selectivity and sensitivity, and selectively differentiate between Y. pestis and other Gram-negative bacteria. The researchers hope to be able to use this to develop applications for patient diagnostics. The development of corresponding tests is the focus of their current research.

About the Author
Prof. Peter Seeberger is Director at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces in Potsdam and Professor at the Freie Universität Berlin. Since 2003, he has served as an affiliate professor at the Burnham Institute in La Jolla, CA (USA). His main specialty is synthetic carbohydrate chemistry. His research interests focus on the role of complex carbohydrates and glycoconjugates in information transfer in biological systems. His group has developed new methods for the automated solid-phase synthesis of complex carbohydrates and glycosaminoglycans that serve as molecular tools.

Author: Peter H. Seeberger, Max-Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany), http://www.mpikg.mpg.de/177410/employee_page?employee_id=22356

Title: Plague Detection by Anti-carbohydrate Antibodies
Angewandte Chemie International Edition, Permalink to the article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/anie.201301633

Peter H. Seeberger | Angewandte Chemie
Further information:
http://pressroom.angewandte.org
http://www.mpikg.mpg.de/177410/employee_page?employee_id=22356

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Newly designed molecule binds nitrogen
23.02.2018 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Atomic Design by Water
23.02.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Attoseconds break into atomic interior

A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. This has made it possible to observe the interaction of multiple photons in a single such pulse with electrons in the inner orbital shell of an atom.

In order to observe the ultrafast electron motion in the inner shells of atoms with short light pulses, the pulses must not only be ultrashort, but very...

Im Focus: Good vibrations feel the force

A group of researchers led by Andrea Cavalleri at the Max Planck Institute for Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) in Hamburg has demonstrated a new method enabling precise measurements of the interatomic forces that hold crystalline solids together. The paper Probing the Interatomic Potential of Solids by Strong-Field Nonlinear Phononics, published online in Nature, explains how a terahertz-frequency laser pulse can drive very large deformations of the crystal.

By measuring the highly unusual atomic trajectories under extreme electromagnetic transients, the MPSD group could reconstruct how rigid the atomic bonds are...

Im Focus: Developing reliable quantum computers

International research team makes important step on the path to solving certification problems

Quantum computers may one day solve algorithmic problems which even the biggest supercomputers today can’t manage. But how do you test a quantum computer to...

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Basque researchers turn light upside down

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Finnish research group discovers a new immune system regulator

23.02.2018 | Health and Medicine

Attoseconds break into atomic interior

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>