Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New study finds compounds show promise in blocking STAT3 signaling as treatment for osteosarcoma

12.04.2011
A study appearing in the journal Investigational New Drugs and conducted by researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital, discovered that two new small molecule inhibitors are showing promise in blocking STAT3, a protein linked to the most common malignant bone tumor, osteosarcoma. These small molecule inhibitors – one derived from a portion of the turmeric spice – may serve as a new, non-toxic treatment for these deadly tumors.

Osteosarcoma is aggressive and its treatment outlook has not changed significantly over the last 20 years. Treatment consists of a combination of toxic chemotherapy and aggressive surgical resection. Yet, despite these options, patients have at most a 50-to-60 percent five-year disease-free survival rate.

"The outcome for patients with advanced or metastatic osteosarcoma continues to be dismal, emphasizing the need for new therapies," said the study's lead author Jaiyuh Lin, PhD, principal investigator in the Center for Childhood Cancer in The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital. "Directly targeting STAT3 signaling represents a potential therapeutic approach to treating this type of cancer."

STAT3 is a member of a protein family that plays a role in relaying signals from cytokines and growth factors. The abnormal activation of STAT proteins is becoming more commonly associated with unrestricted cell growth and transformation of normal cells into malignant cells. Abnormal STAT3 activation has been seen in human and canine osteosarcoma cell lines and shows cancer-causing-capabilities in cultured cells and mouse models.

"Recent experiments aimed at blocking STAT3 signaling have been successful, resulting in the inhibition of growth and the induction of death in tumors," said Dr. Lin, also a faculty member at The Ohio State University College of Medicine. "They have also shown that blocking STAT3 in normal cells is neither harmful nor toxic."

Dr. Lin and his team evaluated two newly developed compounds, LLL12 and FLLL32, to determine their ability to inhibit STAT3 activity in human osteosarcoma cells. FLLL32 is derived from the dietary agent curcumin, the principal compound in the popular Indian spice turmeric.

Findings showed that both agents were able to inhibit STAT3 activity and suppressed tumor growth in the mouse model that was developed using human osteosarcoma cells, and primary osteosarcoma xenograft provided by Nationwide Children's Hospital scientist, Peter Houghton, PhD, directly from a patient.

"This study suggests that LLL12 and FLLL32 should be suitable for targeting osteosarcoma and possibly certain types of cancer cells with persistently activated STAT3," said Dr. Lin. "This approach deserves further exploration as a potential treatment of osteosarcoma."

The development of both STAT3 inhibitors is in the collaboration with Drs. Chenglong Li, Pui-Kai Li and Jim Fuchs from The Ohio State University College of Pharmacy.

Ranked in U.S.News & World Report's 2010 "America's Best Children's Hospitals" and Parents magazine's 2009 top 10 "Best Children's Hospitals" lists, Nationwide Children's Hospital is one of the nation's largest not-for-profit freestanding pediatric healthcare networks providing care for infants, children, adolescents and adult patients with congenital disease. As home to the Department of Pediatrics of The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Nationwide Children's Hospital faculty train the next generation of pediatricians, scientists and pediatric specialists. The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital is one of the top 10 National Institutes of Health-funded free-standing pediatric research facilities in the U.S., supporting basic, clinical, translational and health services research at Nationwide Children's Hospital. Currently, two buildings totalling approximately 300,000 square feet are dedicated to research on the Nationwide Children's campus. An additional 225,000 square feet of research space will be added when a third research building opens in 2012. More information is available at NationwideChildrens.org/Research.

Erin Pope | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.NationwideChildrens.org

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Unique genome architectures after fertilisation in single-cell embryos
30.03.2017 | IMBA - Institut für Molekulare Biotechnologie der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften GmbH

nachricht Transport of molecular motors into cilia
28.03.2017 | Aarhus University

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

'On-off switch' brings researchers a step closer to potential HIV vaccine

30.03.2017 | Health and Medicine

Penn studies find promise for innovations in liquid biopsies

30.03.2017 | Health and Medicine

An LED-based device for imaging radiation induced skin damage

30.03.2017 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>