Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Special issue of Gut Microbes on Helicobacter pylori

19.11.2013
A special issue on Helicobacter pylori has been published by Landes Bioscience (Austin, TX USA). The articles contained in this special issue of the journal Gut Microbes have been authored by world-class investigators and provide new insights into the pathophysiology, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of this microbe.

Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative, microaerophilic bacterium found in the stomach. Identified in the early 1980s, it was shown to be present in patients with chronic gastritis and gastric ulcers, conditions that were not previously believed to have a microbial cause. It is also linked to the development of duodenal ulcers and stomach cancer.

However, in over 80% of carriers, H. pylori does not cause symptoms and it has been suggested that the bacterium may play an important role in the natural stomach ecology. H. pylori is the most common bacterial infection worldwide, with more than half of the world's population harboring the bacterium in the upper gastrointestinal tract. While incidence is decreasing in Western countries, H. pylori infection is highly prevalent in developing countries. In the absence of targeted antimicrobial therapy, colonization typically lasts for decades.

Dr Richard Peek from Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center and Cancer Biology (Nashville, TN USA) has worked with the editorial team of Gut Microbes to organize this special issue on H. pylori. Papers in the issue discuss the role of childhood infection in the sequelae of H. pylori disease (Guillermo Perez-Perez), how glyco-conjugates promote virulence of H. pylori (M Stephen Trent), interplay of various H. pylori factors with host protein receptors (Steffen Backert), the role of chronic inflammation and oxidative stress in H. pylori induced gastric cancer (Keith T Wilson), diet, microbial virulence, and H. pylori induced gastric cancer (Timothy L Cover), consequences of H. pylori infection in children in developing countries (Jean E Crabtree), role of the gastrointestinal microbiome in H. pylori pathogenesis (James G Fox), biomarkers of H. pylori associated gastric cancer (Jay V Solnick), H. pylori therapies in light of evolving resistance (Francis Mégraud), benefits of H. pylori treatment in childhood (Karen J Goodman), vaccination against H. pylori (Steven J Czinn), and a study investigating the influence of H. pylori on hepatitis C virus-associated liver cancer.

In an accompanying editorial, Dr Peek highlights the importance of understanding the relationship between H. pylori infection and carcinogenesis. He writes, "Delineation of bacterial, host, and environmental mediators that augment gastric cancer risk has profound ramifications for both physicians and biomedical researchers, as such findings will not only focus prevention approaches that target H. pylori-infected human populations at increased risk for stomach cancer, but will also provide mechanistic insights into inflammatory carcinomas that develop beyond the gastric niche." The full issue is available at the following link: http://www.landesbioscience.com/journals/gutmicrobes/toc/volume/4/issue/6/

Published by Landes Bioscience since 2010, Gut Microbes is a multi-disciplinary journal dedicated to bringing together basic and clinical research on all apects of microorganisms populating the intestine. Established in 2002, Landes Bioscience is an Austin, Texas-based publisher of biology research journals and books. For more information on Landes Bioscience, please visit http://www.landesbioscience.com/.

Andrew Thompson | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.landesbioscience.com

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New risk factors for anxiety disorders
24.02.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers
24.02.2017 | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>