Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Sensitive balance in the immune system

11.04.2014

Too much of a protein called c-FLIPR can trigger autoimmune diseases

As strange as it may seem, a process called "cellular suicide" is actually crucial for the survival of the entire body. A protein called c-FLIPR plays a key role in controlling this process, which is called "apoptosis".


Inflammed lung tissue with immune cells that have migrated into the lungs. Their nuclei are stained blue. HZI/Pils

Scientists at the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI) have described the significance of c-FLIPR for the immune system in more detail: In the presence of an excess of this molecule, mice can fight infectious diseases better, but they develop autoimmune diseases as they get older. The inhibitory effect of c-FLIPR on apoptosis is the underlying cause of both these effects.

Apoptosis is used by cells that are changed by disease or are simply not needed any longer to eliminate themselves before they become a hazard to the body—on a cellular level, death is part of life. Disruption of this process can lead to cancer or immunodeficiencies, but also to autoimmune diseases, in which cells attack their own body.

HZI scientist Prof Ingo Schmitz and his team investigate the regulation of apoptosis in the immune system. In collaboration with researchers of the Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg and the Helmholtz Zentrum München, they elucidated the role of a central protein in this process.

The researchers published their results in "Cell Death & Disease". So-called c-FLIP proteins inhibit signaling cascades that can lead to apoptosis. This is important temporarily in the response to pathogens to ensure that lymphocytes, a type of immune cells, can proliferate sufficiently. Towards the end of the immune response, once the lymphocytes completed their tasks and successfully eliminated the pathogen, c-FLIP is usually degraded. As a result, apoptosis is enabled again, the lymphocytes die and the equilibrium in the immune system is restored.

The HZI researchers then took a closer look at the exact function of a certain variant of the protein, called c-FLIPR. They used mice to investigate what happens if this protein is always present in lymphocytes and other blood cells. Whereas the apoptosis inhibitor caused no anomalies in young mice, the scenario in older mice was quite different: "The composition of the lymphocytes was changed significantly," says Schmitz. "Furthermore the immune cells were strongly activated."

The overactivation is easily apparent in the body. The researchers found immune molecules, called autoantibodies, which attack the body's own tissue in the kidneys and lung. In addition, they detected harmful protein deposits in the kidneys. The changes in the lung tissue are also indicative of the immune system attacking its own body in the presence of too much c-FLIPR. "Immune cells migrate into the lung and attack the lung tissue," says Schmitz. Physicians usually see these symptoms in a human autoimmune disease called systemic lupus erythematosus

The HZI scientists discovered already last year that cells can fight bacterial infections better if c-FLIPR is turned on permanently. This means that inhibiting the suicide of cells has beneficial effects in acute infections, but leads to autoimmune reactions in the long run. "c-FLIPR is important for the balance of the immune system. It might be possible to intervene with suitable therapeutic agents if the equilibrium of the immune system is disrupted," says Schmitz.

Original publication
Frida Ewald, Michaela Annemann, Marina C. Pils, Carlos Plaza-Sirvent, Frauke Neff, Christian Erck, Dirk Reinhold, Ingo Schmitz
Constitutive expression of murine c-FLIPR causes autoimmunity in aged mice
Cell Death & Disease, 2014

The research group "Systems-oriented Immunology and Inflammation Research" studies the molecular processes that sensitize immune cells to the body’s own tissues. A main focus is on the cellular suicide programme apoptosis.

The Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI)
Scientists at the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research in Braunschweig, Germany, are engaged in the study of different mechanisms of infection and of the body’s response to infection. Helping to improve the scientific community’s understanding of a given bacterium’s or virus’ pathogenicity is key to developing effective new treatments and vaccines.
http://www.helmholtz-hzi.de

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.helmholtz-hzi.de/en/news_events/news/view/article/complete/sensitive_... - This press release on www.helmholtz-hzi.de

Dr. Birgit Manno | Helmholtz-Zentrum

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Fish Oil-Diet Benefits May be Mediated by Gut Microbes
28.08.2015 | University of Gothenburg

nachricht Bio-fabrication of Artificial Blood Vessels with Laser Light
28.08.2015 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: OU astrophysicist and collaborators find supermassive black holes in quasar nearest Earth

A University of Oklahoma astrophysicist and his Chinese collaborator have found two supermassive black holes in Markarian 231, the nearest quasar to Earth, using observations from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

The discovery of two supermassive black holes--one larger one and a second, smaller one--are evidence of a binary black hole and suggests that supermassive...

Im Focus: What would a tsunami in the Mediterranean look like?

A team of European researchers have developed a model to simulate the impact of tsunamis generated by earthquakes and applied it to the Eastern Mediterranean. The results show how tsunami waves could hit and inundate coastal areas in southern Italy and Greece. The study is published today (27 August) in Ocean Science, an open access journal of the European Geosciences Union (EGU).

Though not as frequent as in the Pacific and Indian oceans, tsunamis also occur in the Mediterranean, mainly due to earthquakes generated when the African...

Im Focus: Self-healing landscape: landslides after earthquake

In mountainous regions earthquakes often cause strong landslides, which can be exacerbated by heavy rain. However, after an initial increase, the frequency of these mass wasting events, often enormous and dangerous, declines, in fact independently of meteorological events and aftershocks.

These new findings are presented by a German-Franco-Japanese team of geoscientists in the current issue of the journal Geology, under the lead of the GFZ...

Im Focus: FIC Proteins Send Bacteria Into Hibernation

Bacteria do not cease to amaze us with their survival strategies. A research team from the University of Basel's Biozentrum has now discovered how bacteria enter a sleep mode using a so-called FIC toxin. In the current issue of “Cell Reports”, the scientists describe the mechanism of action and also explain why their discovery provides new insights into the evolution of pathogens.

For many poisons there are antidotes which neutralize their toxic effect. Toxin-antitoxin systems in bacteria work in a similar manner: As long as a cell...

Im Focus: Fraunhofer IPA develops prototype of intelligent care cart

It comes when called, bringing care utensils with it and recording how they are used: Fraunhofer IPA is developing an intelligent care cart that provides care staff with physical and informational support in their day-to-day work. The scientists at Fraunhofer IPA have now completed a first prototype. In doing so, they are continuing in their efforts to improve working conditions in the care sector and are developing solutions designed to address the challenges of demographic change.

Technical assistance systems can improve the difficult working conditions in residential nursing homes and hospitals by helping the staff in their work and...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Networking conference in Heidelberg for outstanding mathematicians and computer scientists

20.08.2015 | Event News

Scientists meet in Münster for the world’s largest Chitin und Chitosan Conference

20.08.2015 | Event News

Large agribusiness management strategies

19.08.2015 | Event News

 
Latest News

Interstellar seeds could create oases of life

28.08.2015 | Physics and Astronomy

An ounce of prevention: Research advances on 'scourge' of transplant wards

28.08.2015 | Health and Medicine

Fish Oil-Diet Benefits May be Mediated by Gut Microbes

28.08.2015 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>