Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Scientists at IRB Barcelona discover a new protein critical for mitochondria

03.11.2010
This finding has brought them the “Paper of the week” of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, one of the journals of greatest impact in basic biology.

Called SLIMP, the protein is required for mitochondria maintenance, the cellular powerhouses.

On the right side we can see aberrant fly and mitochondria when SLIMP is silenced.

A study by the team headed by Lluís Ribas de Pouplana, ICREA professor at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona), has been chosen as “Paper of the week” in the December issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, which is already available online. The article describes the discovery of a new protein in the fly Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) that is crucial for mitochondria. The removal of SLIMP in these flies leads to aberrant mitochondria and loss of metabolic capacity, thus causing death.

The study, whose first author is Tanit Guitart, a PhD student in Ribas’ lab, has been recognised as “Paper of the week” award because of the “significance and global relevance” of the research performed. Furthermore, the editors have included it among the best studies that have appeared in the journal this year. Of the 6600 articles published, only between 50 and 100 receive the distinction of “Article of the week”.

Result of animal evolution
The SLIMP protein derives from a seryl-tRNA synthetase, universal enzymes that are crucial for the synthesis of new proteins. However, SLIMP has lost its original function and performs a different biological role, which remains to be determined. The researchers studied its possible implication in the regulation of mitochondrial division and the interaction with nucleic acids (DNA, RNA).

SLIMP evolved by duplication of the seryl-tRNA synthetase about 540 million years ago, at the beginning of the Cambrian, before the appearance of the starfish and sea urchins family. SLIMP is not present in vertebrates, and it is possible that another protein has taken over its function. “If this were the case, we could look for the protein equivalent in vertebrates, determine its function and focus on these organisms. Here we have work for the next ten years”, says Ribas. This study was performed in collaboration with researchers in the groups devoted to “Heterogenic and Multigenic Diseases” and “Chromatin structure and function”, both at IRB Barcelona.

Reference article:
A new aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase-like protein in insecta with an essential mitochondrial function
Tanit Guitart, Teresa Leon Bernardo, Jessica Segalés, Thomas Stratmann, Jordi Bernués and Lluís Ribas de Pouplana

Journal of Biological Chemistry (2010) [DOI: 10.1074/jbc.M110.167486]

Sònia Armengou | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.irbbarcelona.org
http://www.irbbarcelona.org/index.php/en/news/irb-news/scientific/scientists-at-irb-barcelona-discover-a-new-protein-critical-for-mitoc

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht When Air is in Short Supply - Shedding light on plant stress reactions when oxygen runs short
23.03.2017 | Institut für Pflanzenbiochemie

nachricht WPI team grows heart tissue on spinach leaves
23.03.2017 | Worcester Polytechnic Institute

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

When Air is in Short Supply - Shedding light on plant stress reactions when oxygen runs short

23.03.2017 | Life Sciences

Researchers use light to remotely control curvature of plastics

23.03.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Sea ice extent sinks to record lows at both poles

23.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>