Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Scientists identify a key molecule that blocks abnormal blood vessel growth in tumors

Collaborative Efforts Between Moffitt Cancer Center And University Of Florida Scientists Identify A Key Molecule That Blocks Abnormal Blood Vessel Growth In Tumors

A new and better understanding of blood vessel growth and vascular development (angiogenesis) in cancer has been made possible by research carried out by a team of scientists from Moffitt Cancer Center, the University of Florida, Harvard University, Yale University and the Children's Hospital of Los Angeles.

The research team published the results of their investigation in a recent issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"Vascular development is a fundamental biological process that is tightly controlled by both pro-and anti-angiogenic mechanisms," said Edward Seto, Ph.D., a co-author of the study and professor and chairman of the Department of Molecular Oncology at Moffitt. "Physiological angiogenesis occurs in adults only under specific settings. Excess angiogenesis contributes to a variety of diseases, including cancer. In cancer, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is commonly overproduced."

The goal of the research was to determine how angiogenesis is regulated by positive and negative biological activities.

"Understanding the biological principles that direct vascular growth has important clinical implications because cancers are highly vascularized," concluded Seto.

This meant seeking a better understanding of the relationship between the chromatin insulator binding factor CTCF and how it regulates VEGF expression.

"At the heart of vascular development is VEGF which, in precise doses, is an important stimulator of normal blood vessel growth," explained Seto. "However, VEGF - probably the most important stimulator of normal and pathological blood vessel growth - is regulated by a number of factors."

According to Seto, the study suggests that CTCF can block VEGF from being activated. Therefore, targeting CTCF may be an effective way to fine tune VEGF and control angiogenesis. The potential to manipulate CTCF opens a window to regulate VEGF and subsequently, the potential to manage angiogenesis and cancer.

"The real significance of this work has been apparent in experiments done at the University of Florida and at Harvard University, where our colleagues used mouse models to demonstrate that depletion of CTCF produces excess angiogenesis in animals," explained Seto. "Like finding a small key piece in a giant puzzle, it's truly exciting."

About Moffitt Cancer Center
Located in Tampa, Florida, Moffitt Cancer Center is an NCI Comprehensive Cancer Center - a designation that recognizes Moffitt's excellence in research and contributions to clinical trials, prevention and cancer control. Moffitt currently has 14 affiliates in Florida, one in Georgia, one in Pennsylvania and two in Puerto Rico. Additionally, Moffitt is a member of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, a prestigious alliance of the country's leading cancer centers, and is listed in U.S. News & World Report as one of "America's Best Hospitals" for cancer. Moffitt marks a very important anniversary in 2011 - 25 years committed to one mission: to contribute to the prevention and cure of cancer.

Ferdie De Vega | EurekAlert!
Further information:

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Gene therapy shows promise for treating Niemann-Pick disease type C1
27.10.2016 | NIH/National Human Genome Research Institute

nachricht 'Neighbor maps' reveal the genome's 3-D shape
27.10.2016 | International School of Advanced Studies (SISSA)

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

How nanoscience will improve our health and lives in the coming years

27.10.2016 | Materials Sciences

OU-led team discovers rare, newborn tri-star system using ALMA

27.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

'Neighbor maps' reveal the genome's 3-D shape

27.10.2016 | Life Sciences

More VideoLinks >>>