Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Scientists have discovered genes that increase the risk of osteoporosis and fractures

23.04.2012
Researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have identified the genetic variations that are believed to cause osteoporosis.
The study, published in Nature Genetics and involving leading researchers from Sweden and the world, shows among other interesting facts that women with a higher proportion of genetic variations associated with osteoporosis have a more than 50 percent increased fracture risk.

Osteoporosis is a common and a devastating age-related disease about 50 percent of all who have a hip fracture after age 80 die within one year from the time of injury. The consequences of osteoporosis are therefore well-known, but the causes of the disease are largely unknown.

56 genetic regions for bone density
In a groundbreaking international study, which is led partially from the Sahlgrenska Academy, researchers have now succeeded in identifying a total of 56 genetic regions that control bone density in human beings. Fourteen of these genetic variants increase the risk of fractures, the study, which has been published in the world-leading journal Nature Genetics, has shown.
”This is the first time anyone has identified the genetic variants that are so strongly associated with an increased risk of fracture,” comments Claes Ohlsson, a professor at the Sahlgrenska Academy.

Study on 80,000 people
An international consortium, which also involves researchers from Umeå University, Uppsala University and Malmö University, is behind the study. In total, the researchers studied the genetic make-up of a total of 80,000 people and 30,000 fracture cases, making it the world's largest genetic study in this particular area of research.
”We can prove that women who have a large number of genetic variants associated with low bone density have up to a 56 percent higher risk of osteoporosis as compared with women who have a normal set-ups of the same genetic variants,” comments Claes Ohlsson.

Targets for new treatment methods
The results have led to several new findings in bone biology, among other things the researchers identified several important molecular signaling pathways for bone density that can be targets for new treatment methods and therapies.

”In addition to already known proteins and pathways that were confirmed by the study, we are now facing a whole new biology in the field of bone research,” comments Ulrika Pettersson, Associate Professor in the Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Umeå University, and co-author of the study.

The article ”Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 56 bone mineral density loci and reveals 14 loci associated with the risk of fracture” has been published in Nature Genetics on 15 April.

The study is part of the EU-funded project: Genetic Factors of Osteoporosis (GEFOS).

Bibliographic data:
Journal: Nature
Title: Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 56 bone mineral density loci and reveals 14 loci associated with risk of fracture
Authors: Karol Estrada, Unnur Styrkarsdottir, Evangelos Evangelou, Yi-Hsiang Hsu, Emma L Duncan, Evangelia E Ntzani, Ling Oei, Omar M E Albagha, Najaf Amin, John P Kemp, Daniel L Koller, Guo Li, Ching-Ti Liu, Ryan L Minster, Alireza Moayyeri, Liesbeth Vandenput, Dana Willner, Su-Mei Xiao, Laura M Yerges-Armstrong,Hou-Feng Zheng,Nerea Alonso,Joel Eriksson,Candace M Kammerer,Stephen K Kaptoge,Paul J Leoet al.

For further information please contact:
Claes Ohlsson, Professor at the Center for Bone and Arthritis Research, Department of Internal Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, at the University of Gothenburg

E-mail: claes.ohlsson@medic.gu.se

Helena Aaberg | idw
Further information:
http://www.gu.se
http://bit.ly/HC0qC4

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht UK chemistry researchers develop catalyst that mimics the z-scheme of photosynthesis
26.06.2017 | University of Kentucky

nachricht New research reveals impact of seismic surveys on zooplankton
26.06.2017 | University of Tasmania - Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity

An international team of scientists has proposed a new multi-disciplinary approach in which an array of new technologies will allow us to map biodiversity and the risks that wildlife is facing at the scale of whole landscapes. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. This international research is led by the Kunming Institute of Zoology from China, University of East Anglia, University of Leicester and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research.

Using a combination of satellite and ground data, the team proposes that it is now possible to map biodiversity with an accuracy that has not been previously...

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

Im Focus: Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared light

Temperature measurements possible even on the smallest scale / Molecular ruby for use in material sciences, biology, and medicine

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Dune ecosystem modelling

26.06.2017 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

Insights into closed enzymes

26.06.2017 | Life Sciences

Quantum thermometer or optical refrigerator?

23.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>