Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Scientists 'reprogram' mouse fat cells into clinically useful stem cells

27.07.2010
Australian scientists from the Monash Institute of Medical Research have "reprogrammed" adult mouse fat cells and neural cells to become stem cells that can differentiate into a variety of different cells (pluripotency).

The cells, called "induced pluripotent stem cells" (iPS), are nearly identical to the naturally occurring pluripotent stems cells, such as embryonic stem cells, which are highly pluripotent, in short supply and their access restricted in the U.S.

The study is published in issue 19(5) of Cell Transplantation and is now freely available on-line at http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/cog/ct/ .

"Induced pluripotent stem cells have revolutionized cell reprogramming," said the study's lead author, Dr. Paul J. Verma. "One challenge is to find the most appropriate cell for reprogramming. Our study demonstrated that both neural stem cells (NSCs) and adipose tissue-derived cells (ADCs) from adult mice expressed genetic pluripotency and could differentiate into the three germ layers, endoderm, mesoderm and ectoderm. The ADCs were the most amenable to reprogramming."

According to Dr. Verma, iPS cells have been shown to have many of the hallmarks of embryonic stem cells. Choosing which cells were best for reprogramming required looking at the ease of access and ease of derivation and growth of the cells in vitro. They concluded that it was likely that certain iPS cell lines will have a "higher propensity to differentiate into certain lineages (cell types)."

"This variation may be related to different levels of programming achieved," added Dr. Verma. "Many different cell types need to be investigated to generate many iPS lines for specific differentiation and different research purposes."

The research team concluded that ADCs represent a more clinically relevant cell type and that fat tissue can be easily accessed and grown easily and rapidly in cultures. Fat tissue cells, when reprogrammed, can also be prolific. The authors cited a study previously published in Cell Transplantation (16:9) suggesting that 100 ml of human fat tissue could yield one million clinically useful stem cells.

Their work takes the development of iPS cells a step closer toward their eventual clinical use in treating human diseases.

"There is considerable potential in the generation of iPS cells for the treatment of a number of disorders" said Dr. Paul Sanberg, coeditor-in-chief and Director of the Center Of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair at the University of South Florida. "Finding the optimal source of cells to start with, is of paramount importance and this study provides reassuring data on a highly favorable source".

Contact: Dr. Paul J. Verma, Monash Institute of Medical Research 2731 Wright St. Clayton 3172 VIC Australia. Tel:+ 61 3 9594 7000; Fax: +61 3 9594 7416 Email: Paul.Verma@med.monash.edu.au

The editorial offices for Cell Transplantation are at the Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair, College of Medicine, the University of South Florida and the Diabetes Research Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. Contact, David Eve, PhD. at celltransplantation@gmail.com or Camillo Ricordi, MD at ricordi@miami.edu

News Release by Randolph Fillmore, www.sciencescribe.net

David Eve | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/cog/ct/
http://www.sciencescribe.net

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Newly designed molecule binds nitrogen
23.02.2018 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Atomic Design by Water
23.02.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Attoseconds break into atomic interior

A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. This has made it possible to observe the interaction of multiple photons in a single such pulse with electrons in the inner orbital shell of an atom.

In order to observe the ultrafast electron motion in the inner shells of atoms with short light pulses, the pulses must not only be ultrashort, but very...

Im Focus: Good vibrations feel the force

A group of researchers led by Andrea Cavalleri at the Max Planck Institute for Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) in Hamburg has demonstrated a new method enabling precise measurements of the interatomic forces that hold crystalline solids together. The paper Probing the Interatomic Potential of Solids by Strong-Field Nonlinear Phononics, published online in Nature, explains how a terahertz-frequency laser pulse can drive very large deformations of the crystal.

By measuring the highly unusual atomic trajectories under extreme electromagnetic transients, the MPSD group could reconstruct how rigid the atomic bonds are...

Im Focus: Developing reliable quantum computers

International research team makes important step on the path to solving certification problems

Quantum computers may one day solve algorithmic problems which even the biggest supercomputers today can’t manage. But how do you test a quantum computer to...

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Basque researchers turn light upside down

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Finnish research group discovers a new immune system regulator

23.02.2018 | Health and Medicine

Attoseconds break into atomic interior

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>