Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Research project to boost European fish farming

02.02.2009
European fish farms are to be globally competitive and produce the best fish in terms of ethics and quality. That is the aim of the Lifecycle research project, which is directed from the University of Gothenburg. A total sum of SEK 130 million is being invested in the project, of which SEK 64 million comes from the EU.

Europe is the part of the world that is most dependent on fish imports. This situation is due in part to the drastic cuts in local sea fish quotas and the collapse of fish stocks, which have also been observed in Sweden.

The increased level of imports may have several consequences: low supply and high prices lead to a decrease in consumption, which in turn results in public-health problems as fish forms part of a healthy diet. The fact that we make use of fish stocks in other parts of the world also contributes to over-exploitation, as well as to multinational fisheries enterprises dislodging local fishing industries. The EU, for example, has bought substantial fishing rights along the coast of Africa. Imports also lead to long-haul transport and make quality control more difficult.

At the same time, there has not been great support for the idea of making up for reduced fishing by developing Swedish fish farming. In its latest research bill, however, the Swedish Government stresses "increased knowledge for the development of aquaculture" as a high-priority area of research. The EU has also announced research funds to improve the competitiveness of the European fish-farming industry. One consequence of this is the launch of the EU project LIFECYCLE, which is directed by Professor Thrandur Björnsson and his research team at the Department of Zoology of the University of Gothenburg.

The purpose of LIFECYCLE is to enhance knowledge of the physiology of fish so that the problems that arise in relation to the life processes of farmed fish can be tackled. Examples of such problems are disruption during larval development and growth, in metamorphosis and puberty, in immunological defence and in adaptations to the environment. Through new research, the project is intended to enhance biological knowledge of these life processes, identify answers to practical problems and improve the fish-farming process, in terms of both ethics and quality.

A total sum of SEK 130 million is being invested in the project. The EU is contributing around SEK 64 million, around ten million of which will be used at the University of Gothenburg for research on growth and development physiology, intestinal physiology, the adaptation of fish to different environments and hormonal regulation of different life processes.

"In this project we will be primarily conducting research on the four most important farmed species in Europe, Atlantic salmon, rainbow trout, sea bream and European sea bass, but also on species such as cod and halibut," says Björnsson.

Fourteen research teams from nine countries are taking part in the four-year EU project which started on 1 February 2009. In the spring, researchers involved in the project will meet in Gothenburg for detailed planning of the cooperation and large-scale trials.

For further information, please contact:
Thrandur Björnsson, Department of Zoology, University of Gothenburg
+46 (0)31-7863691
+46 (0)733-441820
+46 (0)31-122196 (home)
Presscontact:
Krister Svahn
press communicator
Faculty of Science, University of Gothenburg
+46 (0)31-786 49 12
+46 (0)732-096 339
krister.svahn@science.gu.se

Krister Svahn | idw
Further information:
http://www.science.gu.se
http://www.gu.se/

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Molecular microscopy illuminates molecular motor motion
26.07.2017 | Penn State

nachricht New virus discovered in migratory bird in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
26.07.2017 | Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

CCNY physicists master unexplored electron property

26.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Molecular microscopy illuminates molecular motor motion

26.07.2017 | Life Sciences

Large-Mouthed Fish Was Top Predator After Mass Extinction

26.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>