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Gadot Introduces NRGylose - Low Glycemic Sweetener

05.12.2007
Gadot Biochemical Ind. (GBI), Haifa, Israel, introduces NRGylose, a tooth-friendly, slow-digesting sweetener with a low glycemic index. Since NRGylose is digested much slower than sucrose, it contributes to a prolonged glucose and energy supply.

NRGylose is a bulk-sweetener carbohydrate. Chemically known as isomaltulose, it is a disaccharide made by fermentation from refined sugar (sucrose) using a non-GMO bacterial strain.

Compared to sucrose, isomaltulose is digested much more slowly, leading to a low glycemic response while providing the same caloric value as sugar. However, this energy is spread across a longer period of time. Any increase in blood-sugar level is more moderate, and therefore any increase in insulin levels is moderate too.

“This feature makes NRGylose an essential sweetener for diabetics and pre-diabetics,” explains Ronny Hacham, VP Business Development and Marketing at Gadot. “It also has great benefit in sport nutrition. A marathon runner can maintain a constant blood-sugar level more easily with our isomaltulose.”

... more about:
»NRGylose »beverage »sweetener

Isomaltulose is not readily fermented by the bacteria in our mouth and therefore prevents the creation of acids that harm tooth enamel. “Taking these significant advantages into consideration, along with its natural sweet taste, NRGylose is the perfect choice for health-conscious consumers who do not want to compromise on good taste,” notes Hacham.

Isomaltulose’s properties and nutritional benefits can be added to a wide spectrum of formulations, including energy drinks, sports and isotonic drinks, products for diabetics, candy and chocolate bars, milk drinks, yoghurts, soft-drinks and cereals.

“NRGylose is a good example of Gadot’s innovation and commitment to broaden its functional ingredient line and provide continued support to the rapidly growing functional food and beverage sector,” says Hacham. “Gadot produces an extensive range of enrichment minerals and crystalline fructose to further support the functional-health food and beverage market.”

Gadot provides ingredients for the dietary supplement, food and beverage markets. It is a world’s leading supplier of sweeteners and citrate salts, and specializes in developing products which have high bioavailability. Its daughter company, Pharmline, Inc., USA, is a global supplier and manufacturer of high-quality nutritional supplements, standardized phytonutrients and fine chemicals. Pharmline specializes in providing services to the dietary supplement and food and beverages industries.

Contact details:
Mr. Ronny Hacham
VP Business Development & Marketing
Gadot Biochemical Ind.
Tel: 972-4-6461515
Fax: 972-4- 8461509
E-mail: Ronny@gadotbio.com

Ronny Hacham | Gadot Biochemical Ind.
Further information:
http://www.gadotbio.com
http://www.pharmlineinc.com

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