Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

A 'fault' in the cellular power plant explains the abnormal metabolism of tumours

24.10.2007
The increased consumption of glucose that tumour cells exhibit, was thought to be a cause of the extra demand of building blocks required to keep up with an uncontrolled cell growth, but now it is more accepted that it could be the effect of a programmed metabolic change that favours this malignant growth.

The German Nobel laureate Otto Warburg, one of twentieth century's leading scientists observed that tumour cells exhibit an increased aerobic glucose metabolism in their glycolysis process.

Seeing that, Warburg concluded that cancer should be interpreted as a mitochondrial dysfunction, but his hypothesis was not accepted at the time, and was forgotten by the scientific community until it was recently experimentally confirmed, arousing great interest in biotechnological and pharmaceutical companies.

The comeback of Warburg's hypothesis has been greatly helped by the research of a group of Spanish physicians and scientists from the “12 de octubre” hospital in Madrid (López-Ríos, García-García, Pozo-Rodriguez, López-Encuentra and Ballestín) and from the “Universidad Autónoma de Madrid” (Sanchéz-Aragó, Ortega y Berrendero) under the direction of José Manuel Cuezva, professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at the “Centro de Biología Molecular Severo Ochoa”.

... more about:
»Glucose »tumour

Their latest research work, recently published in the prestigious journal Cancer Research, describes how the activity or expression of the protein beta-F1-ATPase (responsible for the synthesis of ATP) that controls the aerobic usage of glucose in a cell, shows an inverse correlation between the glycolysis process and the metabolic energy supply of mitochondria.

The study carried out by Dr. Cuezva´s team focused on lung cancer patients. The increase in glucose capture by the tumours was measured using Positron emission tomography (PET), and then contrasted with the expression of protein beta-F1-ATPase, determined from the tumours obtained after surgery, finding an inverse correlation between the two variables.

They also describe in their research work, that when the beta-F1-ATPase protein expression is inhibited or its activity reduced in the carcinomas, the tumour cells are forced to increase their intake of glucose by glycolytic means. Although this research trend is not new, since this same team already has reported in earlier work how the disruption of the mitochondrial bioenergetic function is a metabolic signature of tumours, and how this could be used in clinical prognosis of patients with colorectal, lung or breast cancer. Among other applications that the team and other research groups consider promising are the uses of this signature as a tool to predict the reaction of a patient to a treatment, or as a therapeutic target against cancer.

The commercial applications of such prospective therapies are already protected by a patent that is owned by the “Universidad Autónoma de Madrid” and is licensed to the Spanish biotechnology firm “Fina Biotech, S.L”. Therefore this study might not sound like a new scientific discovery, but it provides the first evidence that integrates molecular and functional data supporting Warburg's hypothesis emphasizing the importance of the mitochondria in human pathology and more specifically in cancer biology.

Oficina de Cultura Científica | alfa
Further information:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-07-1678

Further reports about: Glucose tumour

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Navigational view of the brain thanks to powerful X-rays
18.10.2017 | Georgia Institute of Technology

nachricht Separating methane and CO2 will become more efficient
18.10.2017 | KU Leuven

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Osaka university researchers make the slipperiest surfaces adhesive

18.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

Space radiation won't stop NASA's human exploration

18.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Los Alamos researchers and supercomputers help interpret the latest LIGO findings

18.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>