Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Better Smaller, But More

15.04.2002


In the city, frogs do not feel as comfortable as in the wild nature because of dirty water, a lack of food, and dangers at every turn. That is why the life of frogs in urban areas is shorter. However, they do not leave these habitats, but adapt to them. Apparently, there are two ways to adapt: either become more tolerant or increase the number of progeny.



Every spring from 1998 to 2001, Elena A. Severtseva and her colleagues from the Biological Faculty of the Moscow State University studied the spawn of two frog species (Rana temporaria and Rana arvalis) most common in Moscow parks and ponds. The scientists counted the number of layings and the quantity of eggs in each laying and measured the diameter of eggs and their yolks using a microscope.

In average, Moscow frogs have smaller eggs than their sisters in the countryside, but each urban frog lays several hundred eggs more than the rural one. The egg diameter is about one millimetre, and the difference between egg sizes in the city and suburbs constitutes several decimal fractions of millimetre, but that is sufficient to gain in quantity. At the same time, urban conditions do not change the yolk size in relation to that of the whole egg; sometimes yolks of Moscow frogs are even larger. Therefore, the embryo has a sufficient food supply to grow into the tadpole, though tadpoles from small eggs need a longer time for development.


The amphibians were studied in several places within Moscow: near the Gorodnya River, in the vicinity of the Kapotnya Oil Plant (district Brateevo), in Vostryakovo (in a pond adjacent to the Moscow Ring Highway and in other three ponds in the park near the cemetery), in the area of Matweevskoe (the Setun River floodplain), and near the railway station Ramenskoe. Similar observations were done at the biological stationary near town Zvenigorod.

Both frog species spend most of their life on the land and come into water pools only to spawn. City frogs are very reticent and almost silent at the breeding time. The researchers have heard their sounds only in Matveevskoe. While the spawn of suburb frogs is assembled in large clusters, that of Moscow ones appears in small clusters all over the spawning area. Oil products and chemicals dissolved in water kill many embryos. The rate of embryo death in Brateevo is five times as high as in natural conditions and reaches 12%. Hence, to survive in cities, the high quantity of eggs is more important than a large size of embryos, the scientists conclude.

Alexander Barne | alphagalileo

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New application for acoustics helps estimate marine life populations
16.01.2018 | University of California - San Diego

nachricht Unexpected environmental source of methane discovered
16.01.2018 | University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Scientists decipher key principle behind reaction of metalloenzymes

So-called pre-distorted states accelerate photochemical reactions too

What enables electrons to be transferred swiftly, for example during photosynthesis? An interdisciplinary team of researchers has worked out the details of how...

Im Focus: The first precise measurement of a single molecule's effective charge

For the first time, scientists have precisely measured the effective electrical charge of a single molecule in solution. This fundamental insight of an SNSF Professor could also pave the way for future medical diagnostics.

Electrical charge is one of the key properties that allows molecules to interact. Life itself depends on this phenomenon: many biological processes involve...

Im Focus: Paradigm shift in Paris: Encouraging an holistic view of laser machining

At the JEC World Composite Show in Paris in March 2018, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be focusing on the latest trends and innovations in laser machining of composites. Among other things, researchers at the booth shared with the Aachen Center for Integrative Lightweight Production (AZL) will demonstrate how lasers can be used for joining, structuring, cutting and drilling composite materials.

No other industry has attracted as much public attention to composite materials as the automotive industry, which along with the aerospace industry is a driver...

Im Focus: Room-temperature multiferroic thin films and their properties

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Tohoku University have developed high-quality GFO epitaxial films and systematically investigated their ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties. They also demonstrated the room-temperature magnetocapacitance effects of these GFO thin films.

Multiferroic materials show magnetically driven ferroelectricity. They are attracting increasing attention because of their fascinating properties such as...

Im Focus: A thermometer for the oceans

Measurement of noble gases in Antarctic ice cores

The oceans are the largest global heat reservoir. As a result of man-made global warming, the temperature in the global climate system increases; around 90% of...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

10th International Symposium: “Advanced Battery Power – Kraftwerk Batterie” Münster, 10-11 April 2018

08.01.2018 | Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

White graphene makes ceramics multifunctional

16.01.2018 | Materials Sciences

Breaking bad metals with neutrons

16.01.2018 | Materials Sciences

ISFH-CalTeC is “designated test centre” for the confirmation of solar cell world records

16.01.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>