Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Cell death in blood vessels may be an early target to prevent coronary disease

20.09.2007
EVGN scientist Martin Bennett, British Heart Foundation Professor of Cardiovascular Sciences at the Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine in Cambridge (UK), identified the direct consequences of apoptosis of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells (VSMC), the programmed cell death that occurs in atherosclerosis, which is a hallmark of vascular degeneration - leading as it often does to myocardial infarction.

In addition, the scientist highlighted the strong parallels existing between the apoptotic microenvironment in cardiovascular disease and those present in the tissues of a few degenerative diseases. In the long run, these data could provide better understanding of other untreatable human pathologies.

The sequence of reactions triggered by apoptosis was presented today, September 19th, at the Fourth Annual Meeting of the European Vascular Genomics Network (EVGN, www.evgn.org), the Network of excellence on cardiovascular disease, which is running in parallel with the 4th European Meeting on Vascular Biology and Medicine (EMVBM).

With more than 400 attendants from all over Europe and representatives from the rest of the world, among whom there are cardiologists, diabetes researchers, hematologists, thrombosis scientists, gene therapists and oncologists, the Bristol Meeting offers a stimulating environment for discussion and future planning.

... more about:
»Plaque »VSMC »apoptosis »atherosclerosis »prevent

Apoptosis, the programmed cell death that occurs when a cell has accumulated sufficient DNA damages that it is unable to repair its DNA, is centrally involved in the pathogenesis of a whole range of human illnesses and injury states, and atherosclerosis is no exception. However, until recently, its exact role in this pathology was unclear.

Martin Bennett, a leading cardiologist and atherosclerosis expert, set up a series of targeted experiments aimed at understanding the precise mechanism of action of this, otherwise useful, process.

“We decided – explained Bennett – to elucidate the role that VSMCs death has in the timeline of atherosclerosis progression. Using a mouse model that reproduces the human condition, we induced apoptosis of VSMCs only inside the vessel wall, observing, at first, a clear enlargement of the atherosclerotic plaques that almost doubled their size. This is a bad prognostic factor, as the more they grow the more the plaques become brittle”. That was exactly the second observation made: after the initial growth, the fibrous cap that encloses a typical plaque became thinner, whereas the plaque core increased. “All these signals – points out Bennett – could be useful at the bedside, for a real-time monitoring of atherosclerosis progression”. Not enough, after these first events, the researchers confirmed that the whole region involved in the apoptotic process undergoes calcification. This, in turn, prevents the remodelling of a vessel and, when occurs in a patient, it worsens his or her prognosis.

Furthermore, from Bennett’s investigation emerged striking analogies with two degenerative diseases: Marfan’s syndrome and Hutchinson Gilford Progeria. In both these diseases the tissues look much similar to the one analysed by Bennett in the atherosclerotic settings, with areas of calcifications, and the same kind of infiltrating cells.

“Early as they are, these data rise hope that apoptosis could be targeted at different levels, in order to prevent the cascade of reactions so noxious for the health. And that, possibly, it will help to find novel therapies also for other ailments”.

Francesca Noceti | alfa
Further information:
http://www.evgn.org/
http://www.ifom-ieo-campus.it

Further reports about: Plaque VSMC apoptosis atherosclerosis prevent

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht A novel socio-ecological approach helps identifying suitable wolf habitats
17.02.2017 | Universität Zürich

nachricht New, ultra-flexible probes form reliable, scar-free integration with the brain
16.02.2017 | University of Texas at Austin

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Biocompatible 3-D tracking system has potential to improve robot-assisted surgery

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Real-time MRI analysis powered by supercomputers

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria in pediatric skin infections

17.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>