Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Formation of new pancreatic blood vessels can determine malignancy

07.08.2007
Scientists of the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ) have shown how the formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) is regulated by a network of hundreds of genes. The transition from healthy pancreatic tissue to pancreatic cancer is characterized by increased activity of angiogenesis-promoting genes.

Microscopically small, newly formed tumors may rest in dormant state for months or even years without forming their own blood vessels. It takes a kind of cellular switch to activate genes that are required for the sprouting of new blood vessels. New vessel formation is often accompanied by rapid, invasive tumor growth and metastasis. Drugs directed against key molecules of angiogenesis are already successfully used today to prolong survival of many cancer patients.

Dr. Dr. Amir Abdollahi and Professor Dr. Dr. Peter Huber at the German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ), collaborating with Heidelberg University and US researchers, have investigated what happens at the molecular level when the angiogenetic switch is operated. The investigators studied the genetic response of blood vessel cells (endothelial cells) to known angiogenesis-promoting factors as well as angiogenesis inhibitors. In the “proangiogenetic” state, angiogenesis-promoting genes are switched on, while antiangiogenetic genes are switched off. The organism responds by sprouting new blood vessels. When the gene network is in “antiangiogenetic” state, the reverse is the case, i.e. the formation of blood vessels is prevented.

Measurements of gene activity in tissues samples of patients with diseases of the pancreas have shown the clinical relevance of these findings. From normal pancreatic tissue via chronic pancreatitis through to pancreatic cancer the researchers found a steady increase in the activity of those genes that had been identified in the cell experiment as angiogenesis-promoting. This trend was studied in more detail on a gene called PPARd, whose role in tumor development and angiogenesis had not been known before. The scientists were able to show that the level of PPARd protein steadily increases from normal tissue via pancreatitis tissue through to metastasizing pancreatic cancer. Other tumors, such as breast cancer and prostate cancer, were also found to produce increased levels of the angiogenesis-promoting protein.

In order to study the protein’s actual role in tumor vessel formation, the investigators transplanted skin and lung cancer cells into genetically engineered mice that do not produce their own PPARd. Compared to normal animals, tumor growth in the genetically engineered mice was signifantly slower with poorer supply of vessels.

However, PPARd is only one of many key switches within the angiogenetic network. “Regulation of angiogenesis seems to be more complex than previously assumed,“ says project leader Peter Huber. “Therefore we think that in cancer treatment it is not sufficient to inhibit only one of the participants. Antiangiogenetic therapy might be improved by targeting several of the network’s key switches. One of these could be PPARd.”

The task of the Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum in Heidelberg (German Cancer Research Center, DKFZ) is to systematically investigate the mechanisms of cancer development and to identify cancer risk factors. The results of this basic research are expected to lead to new approaches in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer. The Center is financed to 90 percent by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research and to 10 percent by the State of Baden-Wuerttemberg. It is a member of the Helmholtz Association of National Research Centers (Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft Deutscher Forschungszentren e.V.).

Press Officer | alfa
Further information:
http://www.dkfz.de

Further reports about: Angiogenesis PPARd angiogenesis-promoting blood vessel pancreatic vessel

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Clock stars: Astrocytes keep time for brain, behavior
27.03.2017 | Washington University in St. Louis

nachricht Cryo-electron microscopy achieves unprecedented resolution using new computational methods
24.03.2017 | DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Electrical 'switch' in brain's capillary network monitors activity and controls blood flow

27.03.2017 | Health and Medicine

Clock stars: Astrocytes keep time for brain, behavior

27.03.2017 | Life Sciences

Sun's impact on climate change quantified for first time

27.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>