Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Artificial Nanopores Take Analyte Pulse

27.07.2007
Reliable nanopores by two-step etching

Resistive pulse sensing represents a very attractive method for identifying and quantifying biomedical species such as drugs, DNA, proteins, and viruses in solution. This method involves measuring changes in the ionic current across a membrane containing a single nanometer-sized pore that separates two electrolyte solutions. As the biological analytes make their way through the pore, they induce transient downward current pulses in the ionic current by transiently blocking the nanopore. The frequency, duration, and magnitude of the current pulse contain telltale information that aids the identification and quantification of the analyte. A biological nanopore, á-hemolysin, supported by a lipid bilayer membrane, works well in the detection of various analytes.

However, a major impediment to this system is its lack of mechanical robustness. Indeed, these biological membranes tend to rupture within a few hours, thus precluding their application in practical sensing devices. Now a team of researchers at the University of Florida have come up with a major breakthrough that will aid the reproducible fabrication of robust synthetic single-nanopore membranes.

The nanopores are prepared by a track-etching method. In this approach, a high-energy particle is passed through a synthetic polymer membrane to create a damage track, which is then chemically etched to convert the track to a pore. A major challenge has been ensuring control and reproducibility of the diameter of the resulting pore. Charles R. Martin and his colleagues have developed a two-step etching method to reproducibly fabricate conical pores in polymer membranes with predictive control of the diameters of the pore openings. The conical pores have two openings on opposite faces: a large-diameter base and a small-diameter tip. Much of the sensing action occurs at the tip, since the bioanalytes block the tip while moving across the membrane. It is thus imperative to control the size of this tip opening.

... more about:
»Analyte »Ion »conical »diameter »etching »nanopore »opening

The researchers use the first etch step to define the base and the tip of the conical pores in the membrane. Subsequently, they use a second etching step, while continuously monitoring the ion current, and stop the etching process when the ion current across the membrane reaches a certain value, corresponding to a well-defined tip diameter. This method allows the predictive and reliable fabrication of conical pores with tip openings varying from 10 to 60 nm, which is in the right regime for detecting biological analytes. Martin and his colleagues have illustrated the dramatic potential of these membranes by detecting a protein analyte, bovine serum albumin, using nanopore sensors with two different tip diameters. The protein more effectively blocks the pores of a nanopore sensor with a tip diameter of 17 nm as compared to a sensor with 27-nm tips, and this is reflected in the current pulse data. “This method may allow us to take artificial nanopore sensors from the bench top to the practical prototype-device development stage”, said Martin, emphasizing that the reproducible preparation of artificial nanopores is critical for the development of resistive-pulse sensors.

Author: Charles R. Martin, University of Florida (USA), http://www.chem.ufl.edu/~crmartin/

Title: A Method for Reproducibly Preparing Synthetic

About Small: Micro and Nano: No small Matter. Science at the nano- and microscale is currently receiving enormous wordwide interest. Published by Wiley-VCH, Small provides the very best forum for experimental and theoretical studies of fundamental and applied interdisciplinary research at these dimensions. Read an attractive mix of peer-reviewed Communications, Reviews, Concepts, Highlights, Essays, and Full Papers.

Small | Small
Further information:
http://www.chem.ufl.edu/~crmartin/
http://pressroom.small-journal.com

Further reports about: Analyte Ion conical diameter etching nanopore opening

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Warming ponds could accelerate climate change
21.02.2017 | University of Exeter

nachricht An alternative to opioids? Compound from marine snail is potent pain reliever
21.02.2017 | University of Utah

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Start codons in DNA may be more numerous than previously thought

21.02.2017 | Life Sciences

An alternative to opioids? Compound from marine snail is potent pain reliever

21.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Warming ponds could accelerate climate change

21.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>