Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Bioelectronics: Progress toward drug screening with a cell–transistor biosensor

27.06.2007
To develop selective measurement techniques for diagnostics, drug research, and the detection of poisons, researchers would like to combine the high specificity of biochemical reactors with universal microelectronics.

Now, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry in Martinsried/Munich have shown that such bioelectronic hybrid systems are no longer just a utopian vision. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, they describe the coupling of a receptor to a silicon chip by means of a cell–transistor interface.

Many receptors are coupled to ion channels within cell membranes. When the corresponding ligand binds to its receptor, the channel is opened, allowing ions to stream into the cell. With a few tiny electrodes (the patch-clamp technique), this stream of ions can be measured; however, this technique destroys the cell. A team headed by Peter Fromherz has now proven that things can be different. Their novel, noninvasive sensor involves coupling of the ion stream directly to a microelectronic device by means of a direct cell–chip contact.

Their test subject was the serotonin receptor, a protein that resides in the membrane and plays an important role in the nervous system. Blockers specific to this receptor are used clinically to reduce the nausea that results from chemotherapy and for the treatment of irritable bowl syndrome. The scientists allowed cells with many serotonin receptors in their membranes to grow onto a silicon chip with a linear arrangement of many transistor switches. For measurement, a cell that covers the tiny gap (gate) of one of the transistors must be selected. The voltage in this cell is controlled with a special electrode. If serotonin is then applied, the ion channels open; a stream of ions flows along a narrow gap between the cell and the chip into the cell. The resulting signal in the transistor voltage is proportional to the current across the membrane.

... more about:
»Membrane »STREAM »Serotonin »receptor

By using a variety of serotonin concentrations, a dosage–effect relationship can be determined. The application of new potential receptor blockers allows their effectiveness to be quickly and easily evaluated by means of their effect on the transistor signal. “With this coupling of a ligand-steered ion channel to a transistor at the level of an individual cell,” Fromherz says, “we have laid the foundation for receptor-cell–transistor biosensor technology.”

Jennifer Beal | alfa
Further information:
http://pressroom.angewandte.org

Further reports about: Membrane STREAM Serotonin receptor

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Topologische Quantenchemie
21.07.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe

nachricht Topological Quantum Chemistry
21.07.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>