Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Discovery of the cellular origin of Ewing’s sarcoma

16.05.2007
Inserm researchers at the Institut Curie have identified the cells that cause Ewing’s sarcoma. They are cells of the mesenchyme, the connective tissue that supports other tissues. The Institut Curie is the reference center in France for Ewing’s sarcoma, a bone tumor of children, adolescents, and young adults.

The researchers have also succeeded “to make” the tumor cells to become virtually normal mesenchymal cells again. These results, published in Cancer Cell on 7 May 2007, open up new therapeutic possibilities for blocking the development of Ewing’s sarcoma in young patients.

Ewing’s sarcoma (1) is the second most frequent malignant bone tumor in France, with 50 to 100 new cases a year. It occurs in children, teenagers, and young adults (up to 30 years of age), at a frequency that peaks around puberty, between 10 and 20 years of age. This bone tumor essentially grows in the pelvis, ribs, femur, fibula, and tibia. It is highly invasive and metastases are common, especially in the lungs and skeleton.

Treatment of Ewing’s sarcoma, has progressed greatly in the last thirty years. Nowadays, the therapeutic strategy used in most cases combines chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery. The Institut Curie is the reference center for Ewing’s sarcoma in France, and is internationally renowned both for clinical management of patients and research into this disease.

... more about:
»Ewing’s »Inserm »mesenchymal »sarcoma »therapeutic

New therapeutic leads

Cancers rarely have a simple molecular signature—a specific mutation that causes tumor growth. In the case of Ewing’s sarcoma, a molecular signature was identified and characterized in 1992 by Olivier Delattre’s Inserm team at the Institut Curie. It is an accidental change of genetic material between two chromosomes, which results in the formation of a mutant gene, which codes for an abnormal protein called EWS/FLI-1. This discovery led on to the development of a diagnostic test for Ewing’s sarcoma in 1994. Yet until now, the nature of the cell in which this mutation occurs was unknown.

The group of Olivier Delattre, the Director of Inserm Unit 830 “Genetics and Biology of Cancer” at the Institut Curie, and the team of Pierre Charbord, the Director of Inserm Laboratory ERI5 “Microenvironment of Hematopoiesis and Stem Cells” in Tours, have now discovered that Ewing’s sarcoma are caused by cells of the mesenchyme, a connective tissue that supports other tissues. They have shown that the profile of the transcriptome (2) of Ewing’s sarcoma ressemble that of mesenchymal cells, particularly mesenchymal stem cells, when EWS/FLI-1 is inhibited.

By inhibiting the abnormal protein EWS/FLI-1 that causes Ewing’s sarcoma, the researchers also “forced” the tumor cells to return to their original status of mesenchymal stem cells, which can then differentiate normally into bone or fat cells. This approach opens up new therapeutic prospects, since by forcing the cells to resume their original function it may be possible in the future to make them less aggressive and prevent their proliferation. As long as the tumor cells are still able to fulfill their function, they generally proliferate slowly, and the prognosis is good; once they lose this capacity, however, the tumor cells become highly aggressive.

This discovery could allow Delattre, Charbord and colleagues to produce an animal model of Ewing’s sarcoma, an essential stage in the development of new treatments.

These results, published in the May 7 issue of Cancer Cell, show once more that the close collaboration at the Institut Curie between physicians and researchers is vital to advances in treatments of Ewing’s sarcoma.

Catherine Goupillon | alfa
Further information:
http://www.curie.fr
http://www.cancercell.org/

Further reports about: Ewing’s Inserm mesenchymal sarcoma therapeutic

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Biofuel produced by microalgae
28.02.2017 | Tokyo Institute of Technology

nachricht Decoding the genome's cryptic language
27.02.2017 | University of California - San Diego

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Scientists reach back in time to discover some of the most power-packed galaxies

28.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Nano 'sandwich' offers unique properties

28.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Light beam replaces blood test during heart surgery

28.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>