Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Newborn neurons like to hang with the 'in' crowd

08.05.2007
Like any new kid on the block that tries to fit in, newborn brain cells need to find their place within the existing network of neurons. The newcomers jump right into the fray and preferentially reach out to mature brain cells that are already well connected within the established circuitry, report scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in the online edition of Nature Neuroscience.

At first, they gingerly sniff out pre-existing connections between brain cells but as the new neurons mature over time they get emboldened and muscle out the old guys. "Adding new neurons could be a very problematic process if newborn cells would make connections all over the place," explains Fred H. Gage, Ph.D., a professor in the Gene Expression Laboratory and the Vi and John Adler Chair for Research on Age-Related Neurodegenerative Diseases. "But if they are only replacing already existing connections there is less chance of error," he adds.

Neurons make contact via specialized structures called synapses. As a signal traveling along a nerve branch arrives at the pre-synaptic area, it releases a chemical signal. The signaling molecules travel across the synapse and induce a signal on the neighboring, receiving nerve fiber or dendrite. A typical neuron sports about 7,000 synapses through which it stays in touch with roughly 1,000 other cells. But just how young neurons make their presence known and hook up with already well-connected elders has been unclear.

"If you have hopes that one day neuronal stem cells can replace damaged neurons in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease you have to ensure that these cells make proper connections, form functional synapses and integrate into the rest of the brain," says postdoctoral fellow Nicolas Toni, Ph.D., who headed the current study.

... more about:
»Neuron »Synapse »brain cell »newborn

To figure out how the newcomers do it, the Salk researchers injected a virus carrying the gene for green fluorescent protein into the hippocampus, a brain region harboring neural stem cells that give rise to new neurons. Newly born neurons infected with virus were marked by a fluorescent dye enabling the researchers to follow their fate over time as they tried to get accepted into the existing circuitry.

With the help of a whole arsenal of high-tech imaging technology and the electron tomography expertise of Mark. H. Ellisman, Ph.D., a professor at the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research at the University of California, San Diego, Toni then zoomed in at a nanometer scale and watched how the young and the old got acquainted.

He observed that between three and four weeks after injection of the virus newborn neurons sent out dendritic filopodia—tiny feelers that probe the environment. "When we analyzed them in three dimensions, the tip of the filopodia was preferentially associated with synapses already connected to other neurons," explains Toni.

However, as the new neurons matured, the tiny tips filled out and started to monopolize the synaptic connections. "That's what we believe is the crux of the study: the survival of new neurons may depend on the ability to compete out the older existing neurons," says Gage. Earlier studies had shown that if young neurons fail to receive signals from other brain cells they wither and die. By connecting to functional synapses, the newborn neurons ensure that they are not reaching out to deadbeats.

The Gage lab previously identified a subunit of the NMDA receptor, a protein complex that transduces signals sent by neighboring cells, as the newborn neurons' life-saving equipment. The NMDA receptor is activated by the neurotransmitter glutamate, a chemical released by neurons in order to transmit information to neighboring cells. Whenever the receptor picks up a glutamate signal it is stimulated and relays the signal. For young neurons that signal means survival.

As a matter of fact, only about half of all newly born neurons manage to successfully integrate into the existing network of brain cells, at least in mice living in bare standard cages. Providing the mice with a stimulating, enriched environment—large cages filled with running wheels, colored tunnels and playmates—boost the number of neurons that manage to hook up with the existing network to 80 percent, reinforcing the observation that using one's brain cells is the best way to optimize brain function throughout one's lifetime.

Gina Kirchweger | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.salk.edu

Further reports about: Neuron Synapse brain cell newborn

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Building a brain, cell by cell: Researchers make a mini neuron network (of two)
23.05.2018 | Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo

nachricht Research reveals how order first appears in liquid crystals
23.05.2018 | Brown University

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: LZH showcases laser material processing of tomorrow at the LASYS 2018

At the LASYS 2018, from June 5th to 7th, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) will be showcasing processes for the laser material processing of tomorrow in hall 4 at stand 4E75. With blown bomb shells the LZH will present first results of a research project on civil security.

At this year's LASYS, the LZH will exhibit light-based processes such as cutting, welding, ablation and structuring as well as additive manufacturing for...

Im Focus: Self-illuminating pixels for a new display generation

There are videos on the internet that can make one marvel at technology. For example, a smartphone is casually bent around the arm or a thin-film display is rolled in all directions and with almost every diameter. From the user's point of view, this looks fantastic. From a professional point of view, however, the question arises: Is that already possible?

At Display Week 2018, scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP will be demonstrating today’s technological possibilities and...

Im Focus: Explanation for puzzling quantum oscillations has been found

So-called quantum many-body scars allow quantum systems to stay out of equilibrium much longer, explaining experiment | Study published in Nature Physics

Recently, researchers from Harvard and MIT succeeded in trapping a record 53 atoms and individually controlling their quantum state, realizing what is called a...

Im Focus: Dozens of binaries from Milky Way's globular clusters could be detectable by LISA

Next-generation gravitational wave detector in space will complement LIGO on Earth

The historic first detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes far outside our galaxy opened a new window to understanding the universe. A...

Im Focus: Entangled atoms shine in unison

A team led by Austrian experimental physicist Rainer Blatt has succeeded in characterizing the quantum entanglement of two spatially separated atoms by observing their light emission. This fundamental demonstration could lead to the development of highly sensitive optical gradiometers for the precise measurement of the gravitational field or the earth's magnetic field.

The age of quantum technology has long been heralded. Decades of research into the quantum world have led to the development of methods that make it possible...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Save the date: Forum European Neuroscience – 07-11 July 2018 in Berlin, Germany

02.05.2018 | Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Research reveals how order first appears in liquid crystals

23.05.2018 | Life Sciences

Space-like gravity weakens biochemical signals in muscle formation

23.05.2018 | Life Sciences

NIST puts the optical microscope under the microscope to achieve atomic accuracy

23.05.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>