Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Inflammatory system genes linked to cognitive decline after heart surgery

02.05.2007
Variants of two genes involved in the inflammatory system appear to protect patients from suffering a decline in mental function following heart surgery.

Duke University Medical Center researchers believe their findings could help physicians identify patients at risk of suffering mental decline after heart surgery and raises the possibility that these patients could be treated with drugs that are known to dampen the inflammatory response.

Six years ago, the Duke researchers demonstrated that 42 percent of patients who underwent coronary artery bypass surgery had measurable cognitive decline five years after their procedure. Since that finding, the team has been investigating possible reasons for this decline.

The researchers selected known variations in 37 genes that previous studies had implicated in various impairments of cognitive and mental function. When they looked at more than 500 heart surgery patients and correlated cognitive decline with the patient’s genetic makeup, they discovered that patients with two specific variants were less likely to have problems with areas of cognitive function such as memory, attention and concentration.

“While bypass surgery has saved millions of Americans with coronary artery disease, many patients and families find that cognitive decline after surgery has reduced their quality of life,” said Duke cardiothoracic anesthesiologist Joseph Mathew, M.D., lead investigator of the study reported online Tuesday, May 1, in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health and the American Heart Association.

“The two gene variants we found were involved in some manner with the inflammatory system, raising the possibility that therapies given during surgery aimed at the controlling the inflammatory response would be protective,” Mathew said. “Also, our results provide additional evidence for a genetic basis for the cognitive deterioration seen after heart surgery.”

The researchers found that patients with variants in genes for C-reactive protein and P-selectin were less likely to suffer cognitive decline than were patients without the variants. C-reactive protein plays an important role in the body’s initial response to injury, and studies have shown that high levels of the protein put patients at higher risk for cardiovascular disease and stroke. P-selectin is a molecule that helps recruit circulating white blood cells to the site of an injury.

For their analysis, the researchers gave 513 heart patients at Duke University Hospital a battery of cognitive exams before heart surgery and then six weeks later. They found that patients with the variation of the C-reactive protein gene were 20.6 percent less likely to suffer mental decline, and patients with the P-selectin variant had a 15.2 percent risk reduction. The incidence of deficit in patients with both gene variants was 17 percent compared to 43 percent in patients who had neither variant.

Furthermore, patients with the two gene variants had significantly lower levels of C-reactive protein in their bloodstream and lower P-selectin expression, and the researchers said this factor may provide a biological basis for the protective effect they observed.

“Although we have made significant progress in minimizing the adverse events related to cardiac surgery, little progress has been made in reducing postoperative cognitive decline,” said Mark Newman, M.D., chairman of anesthesiology and senior member of the research team. “While we know that there are many factors involved in this phenomenon, the results of this study provide insight into the genetic factors that influence cognition and may translate into more precise identification of at-risk patients.”

Coronary artery bypass grafting surgery is performed more than 600,000 times a year in the United States for the treatment of coronary artery disease. Typically, surgeons use pieces of blood vessels from other parts of the body to “bypass” clogs in coronary arteries, thereby restoring blood flow to the heart.

Richard Merritt | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mc.duke.edu

Further reports about: C-reactive Coronary P-selectin cognitive decline inflammatory

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Molecular microscopy illuminates molecular motor motion
26.07.2017 | Penn State

nachricht New virus discovered in migratory bird in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
26.07.2017 | Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

CCNY physicists master unexplored electron property

26.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Molecular microscopy illuminates molecular motor motion

26.07.2017 | Life Sciences

Large-Mouthed Fish Was Top Predator After Mass Extinction

26.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>