Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Leukemic cells find safe haven in bone marrow

26.03.2007
St. Jude study shows mesenchymal cells in bone marrow supply leukemic cells with the amino acid asparagine, restoring this critical nutrient when it is depleted by the cancer drug asparaginase

The cancer drug asparaginase fails to help cure some children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) because molecules released by certain cells in the bone marrow counteract the effect of that drug, according to investigators at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

The researchers showed that mesenchymal cells in the bone marrow create a protective niche for leukemic cells by releasing large amounts of asparagine, an amino acid that nearby leukemic cells must have to survive but do not make efficiently. This extra supply of asparagine helps leukemic cells survive treatment with asparaginase, a drug that normally would deplete their supply of this vital nutrient, the researchers reported. Mesenchymal cells give rise to a variety of different tissues, such as osteoblasts (bone-building cells) and chondrocytes (cartilage-building cells), and form the nurturing environment where normal blood cells and leukemic cells grow.

"Leukemic cells that resist asparaginase and survive in this protective niche of the bone marrow might be the reason that leukemia recurs in some children who have been treated with this drug," said Dario Campana, M.D., Ph.D., a member of the St. Jude Oncology and Pathology departments.

Campana is senior author of the report that appears in the online pre-publication issue of "The Journal of Clinical Investigation."

"Our findings indicate that the level of activity of the "ASNS" gene in the mesenchymal cells is key to protecting leukemic cells in the bone marrow from asparaginase," Campana said. "This insight will help researchers find ways to disrupt this safe haven for leukemic cells that need asparagine," added James R. Downing, M.D., St. Jude scientific director and chair of the Pathology department. Downing is a co-author of "The Journal of Clinical Investigation" paper. The "ASNS" gene controls production of the enzyme asparagine synthetase (ASNS), which leukemic cells use to make asparagine.

The study’s findings also suggest that drugs now being developed to block ASNS should be tested to see if they also prevent mesenchymal cells from making this amino acid. In addition, the ability of mesenchymal cells to make asparagine might be decreased by cancer drugs that are already known to disrupt the activity of those cells.

"Because asparaginase is so widely used to treat ALL, this new insight into how mesenchymal cells protect leukemic cells is very important," said Ching-Hon Pui, M.D., chair of the Oncology department and American Cancer Society Professor at St. Jude. "The more we learn about the molecular interactions between these cells, the more likely we’ll be able to enhance the anti-leukemic action of asparaginase and perhaps other anti-leukemic drugs as well," said Pui, a co-author of the paper. "That would reduce the recurrence rate of ALL and continue our successful efforts to increase the survival rate of ALL."

Previous research at St. Jude and elsewhere had shown that direct contact with bone marrow mesenchymal cells is essential for the long-term survival and multiplication of leukemic lymphoblasts. In the current study, the team found that the gene for ASNS was more than 20 times active in producing this enzyme in mesenchymal cells than in ALL cells.

Experiments performed by co-authors Shotaro Iwamoto, M.D., and Keichiro Mihara, postdoctoral fellows in Campana’s laboratory, demonstrated that ALL cells from different patients became much more resistant to asparaginase when cultured on top of a layer of mesenchymal cells. In order to determine whether it was the high levels of asparagine released by mesenchymal cells that protected ALL cells from asparaginase, the St. Jude team repeated the experiment, but blocked the ability of mesenchymal cells to make the ASNS enzyme and produce asparagine. In this case, the protective effect of mesenchymal cells was eliminated. Conversely, when the researchers caused the ASNS gene to work overtime making asparagine, the ability of the mesenchymal cells layer to protect the ALL cells was significantly enhanced. The team also showed that the more actively "ASNS" genes produced ASNS in mesenchymal cells, the higher levels of asparagine they released.

Summer Freeman | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.stjude.org

Further reports about: ASNS Protect asparaginase asparagine leukemic marrow mesenchymal

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Decoding the genome's cryptic language
27.02.2017 | University of California - San Diego

nachricht New risk factors for anxiety disorders
24.02.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New pop-up strategy inspired by cuts, not folds

27.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Sandia uses confined nanoparticles to improve hydrogen storage materials performance

27.02.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

Decoding the genome's cryptic language

27.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>