Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Iowa State researchers improve soy processing by boosting protein and sugar yields

16.02.2007
Graduate student Bishnu Karki turned on an ultrasonic machine in an Iowa State University laboratory. With a loud screech, the machine's high-frequency sound waves churned a mixture of soy flakes and cold water. And that churning could be a major boost to soy processors and the food industry.

Adding ultrasonic pretreatment to soy processing boosts and improves the yield of protein that can be added to foods, said Samir Khanal, an Iowa State research assistant professor of civil, construction and environmental engineering. In Iowa State laboratory tests, exposing ground and defatted soy flakes to ultrasonics has increased the release of soy proteins by 46 percent.

Khanal said the ultrasonic treatment also breaks some of the bonds that tie sugars to the soy proteins. Separating the sugars from the proteins improves the quality of the proteins. It also boosts the sugar content of the soy whey that's left after processing. Ultrasonic treatment boosted sugar yields by 50 percent.

The low-cost, sugar-enriched whey can replace an expensive compound used to grow lactic acid bacteria, Khanal said. The bacteria produce nisin, a valuable natural food preservative that's also used in cosmetic and health care products such as mouthwash and toothpaste.

... more about:
»Boost »Researchers »Soy »processing

"Our preliminary economic analysis showed that the proposed technology could generate revenue up to $230 million per year from a typical plant producing 400 million pounds of soy protein isolate," says a summary of the research project. "This is a major breakthrough in the soy processing industry."

Khanal leads a research team that includes Hans van Leeuwen, an Iowa State professor of civil, construction and environmental engineering; David Grewell, an Iowa State assistant professor of agricultural and biosystems engineering; Stephanie Jung, an Iowa State assistant professor of food science and human nutrition; and Buddhi Lamsal, a senior scientist at Kansas State University in Manhattan. Larry Johnson, the director of Iowa State's Center for Crops Utilization Research, and Tony Pometto, an Iowa State professor of food science and human nutrition, are assisting the project. Iowa State graduate students Bishnu Karki, who's studying environmental science, and Debjani Mitra, who's studying biorenewable resources and technology, are also working on the research project.

The research is supported by a grant of $81,977 from the Grow Iowa Values Fund, a state economic development program. Cargill and other major food processors are supporting the research project with materials and supplies. And the Iowa Biotechnology Byproducts Consortium is supporting the nisin portion of the project with a grant of $155,711.

Khanal said the technology has boosted protein and sugar release in batch-by-batch lab tests. The researchers will now try lab tests to see how it works in the same kind of continuously flowing stream that would be used in a soy processing plant.

The researchers are optimistic the technology can be effective and efficient in a full-size soy processing plant. Van Leeuwen said the ultrasonic treatments only require a few seconds and can be done in a pipeline connecting a plant's soy processing units. He also said the capital costs and power requirements for ultrasonics are small.

Yes, Khanal said, "I think this is commercially viable."

Samir Khanal | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.iastate.edu

Further reports about: Boost Researchers Soy processing

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Decoding the genome's cryptic language
27.02.2017 | University of California - San Diego

nachricht New risk factors for anxiety disorders
24.02.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New pop-up strategy inspired by cuts, not folds

27.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Sandia uses confined nanoparticles to improve hydrogen storage materials performance

27.02.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

Decoding the genome's cryptic language

27.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>