Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Simple 2-gene test sorts out similar gastrointestinal cancers

13.02.2007
Top scoring pair analysis applicable to other cancers, personalized care

A powerful two-gene test distinguishes between a pair of nearly identical gastrointestinal cancers that require radically different courses of treatment, researchers report this week in the online Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

"This simple and accurate test has the potential to be relatively quickly implemented in the clinic to benefit patients by guiding appropriate treatment," says senior author Wei Zhang, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Pathology at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.

The analytical technique employed to tell gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) from leiomyosarcoma (LMS) with near perfect accuracy will have wider application in more individualized diagnosis and treatment of other types of cancer, study co-authors from M. D. Anderson and the Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle conclude.

... more about:
»GIST »Gastrointestinal »LMS »distinguish

GIST was once thought to be a type of leiomyosarcoma because both originate in the smooth muscle cells of the gastrointestinal tract. However, GIST is treatable with the targeted medication known as Gleevec and is relatively unresponsive to chemotherapy. The opposite is true of LMS.

An existing test distinguishes among the two cancers with about 87 percent accuracy, but intensive and time-consuming additional analyses are required for uncertain cases, Zhang says.

The researchers used common whole genome microarrays to measure gene expression in 68 GIST or LMS tumors, but then applied an analytical twist. Rather than identifying multiple genes that might distinguish each type of cancer, the researchers instead analyzed every possible pair of genes, says first author Nathan Price, Ph.D., research scientist at the Institute for Systems Biology, a process called Top Scoring Pair analysis.

The result was a cancer classifier based on the expression ratio of two genes. If the gene OBSCN expresses more of its RNA than the gene C9orf65, then the tumor is GIST. If C9orf65 is more abundant, it's LMS.

The test accurately identified 67 of the 68 microarrayed tumors, with the exception being one tumor with nearly a 50-50 split between the two expressed genes upon which no diagnosis could be made. An additional test using a more accurate measurement procedure on the two genes identified 20 of the original samples (including the sample with near equal gene expression) and 19 independent samples with 100 percent accuracy, the authors report.

Genomic approaches to diagnosing, selecting treatment and determining a cancer patient's prospects of responding to care are beginning to work their way into the clinic, the researchers note. These approaches can rely on dozens of genes as biomarkers.

Top scoring pair analysis allows the use of fewer genes to distinguish between similar cancers or between groups of patients who have one type of cancer yet respond differently based on genetic indicators, the authors note. For example, paired gene analysis may be used to determine which patients benefit from different types of chemotherapy and which patients are at risk of relapse.

Zhang said the research group is using this analytical strategy to identify gene pairs that can predict which GIST patients respond to Gleevec and how other types of cancer respond to treatment as well.

Scott Merville | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mdanderson.org

Further reports about: GIST Gastrointestinal LMS distinguish

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Transport of molecular motors into cilia
28.03.2017 | Aarhus University

nachricht Asian dust providing key nutrients for California's giant sequoias
28.03.2017 | University of California - Riverside

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Periodic ventilation keeps more pollen out than tilted-open windows

29.03.2017 | Health and Medicine

Researchers discover dust plays prominent role in nutrients of mountain forest ecoystems

29.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

OLED production facility from a single source

29.03.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>