Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New biotechnology companies flock to London’s first bioscience innovation centre

08.02.2007
Two new companies have opted to join the London Bioscience Innovation Centre (LBIC), which is the first centre of its kind in London.

LBIC currently provides 21st century laboratory and office facilities for more than 23 biotechnology and diagnostic companies, life science product and service providers, venture investors and small pharmaceutical companies. The two new clients that have recently moved to LBIC are Bridge Genoma and Domainex.

‘LBIC’s emphasis on quality makes us stand out from the crowd and an atmosphere of collegiality underpins everything we do,’ said Professor Colin Howard Vice-Principal, for the Royal Veterinary College and CEO, The London Bioscience Innovation Centre. ‘We are keen to ensure that new client companies are a good ‘fit’ with the philosophy of LBIC, whether they are biotechnology companies, or associated service organisations.’

Bridge Genoma is a private genetic testing lab specialising in Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD). Using the latest technology any known genetic defect can be identified by ‘fingerprinting’ that region of the DNA which may carry the mutation causing the disease. More than 10,000 conditions are known and include such diseases as Cystic Fibrosis, Spinal Muscular Atrophy, Huntingdon disease, Batten disease, Haemophilia A and Sickle Cell Disease.

... more about:
»Biotechnology »Bridge »Domainex »Genoma »LBIC

By Bridge Genoma co-operating with other clinics patients can have this resource made available to them regardless of where they live in the UK. The IVF treatment can take place at a clinic anywhere in the UK and the cell can be sent down for testing – without the parent needing to travel. Currently around half a dozen clinics work with Bridge Genoma from all around the UK including Liverpool, Oxford and London.

‘Until now clinics have had to send samples abroad, which isn’t ideal when you only have a one or two day window at most to carry out the tests.’ Said Professor Alan Handyside, Director, Bridge Genoma. ‘LBIC also offered us good security, health and safety provision, and great facilities. As well as being a great place to network with other scientists, LBIC also offers us facilities that are impressive to our peers and clients.’

Domainex are a spin-out company from The Institute of Cancer Research, Birkbeck , and University College that first set up in 2002. Domainex has created a system that allows the structure of difficult proteins, to be unlocked this is an essential part needed in the process of developing new drugs. Domainex’s system means that pharmaceutical companies can work much faster in drug research and address novel medical targets.

Domainex moved to LBIC in November 2006 and is anticipating further growth in business now that it is based there. Domainex list one of LBIC’s primary benefits is its central location.

Keith Powell, CEO of Domainex, said, ‘The very flexible facilities and availability of meeting rooms for client visits are enormously helpful to young companies which seek to minimize overhead and focus resources on the development of the business. Moving out of the academic environment is an essential part of a growing spin-out, we see the LBIC relationship as a partnership where both sides gain’.

For more information contact: Becci Cussens, Communications Management, Tel: 01727 737980, becci@communicationsmanagement.co.uk

Becci Cussens | alfa
Further information:
http://www.lbic.com/

Further reports about: Biotechnology Bridge Domainex Genoma LBIC

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New insights into the information processing of motor neurons
22.02.2017 | Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience

nachricht Wintering ducks connect isolated wetlands by dispersing plant seeds
22.02.2017 | Utrecht University

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Positrons as a new tool for lithium ion battery research: Holes in the electrode

22.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

New insights into the information processing of motor neurons

22.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Healthy Hiking in Smart Socks

22.02.2017 | Innovative Products

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>