Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Life science spinouts: securing the best legal agreement

31.10.2006
Iron-clad legal agreements aren’t always the best option for science and technology spin-outs, says intellectual property expert Jim Kinnier Wilson. A partner in specialist law firm Manches, Kinnier Wilson will be giving delegates at today’s White Rose Bioscience Forum (Tuesday 31 October) his top tips on getting the best out of legal agreements.

“Legal agreements can be anything from very basic to an extremely complex written document incorporating every conceivable safeguard,” says Kinnier Wilson. “The point of a legal agreement is to provide something that will allow those who signed it (but ultimately a court if it all goes wrong) to judge what everyone had agreed at the time – and in some cases a simpler document can do that quite well.”

“While the risks of a simple agreement are arguably higher, usually the upfront costs will be much lower,” he continues. “It’s important that spin-out companies get good legal advice on the various merits of different levels of agreement and don’t just assume that one size fits all.”

For bioscience spin-outs and start-ups, the number of legal agreements required is considerable, including agreements with shareholders, licensing arrangements, employment contracts with staff, even contracts with suppliers when buying in materials for use in the lab, and eventually the rights and obligations for clinical trials. Many of these are quite specific to the field.

... more about:
»Kinnier »Spin-out »Wilson

With a masters in biochemical engineering, Kinnier Wilson had been planning a career in the pharmaceutical industry, but a summer job in a law firm soon changed that. Fascinated by the idea of applying his science in a different way, he qualified as a solicitor and has been working as an intellectual property specialist for nearly 20 years advising science, engineering and technology spin-out companies.

His current firm, Manches, acts on behalf of a number of research councils, research institutes and universities, advising their spin-out life science companies in all stages of development. “To offer advice, it helps to understand the technology these companies are working with,” says Kinnier Wilson. “My work brings me into contact with an amazing array of different scientific technologies. Every day is different and every day is fascinating.”

Jo Kelly | alfa
Further information:
http://www.whiterose.ac.uk/events/bioscienceforum

Further reports about: Kinnier Spin-out Wilson

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Biomarkers for identifying Tumor Aggressiveness
26.07.2017 | Max-Delbrück-Centrum für Molekulare Medizin in der Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft

nachricht The dense vessel network regulates formation of thrombocytes in the bone marrow
25.07.2017 | Rudolf-Virchow-Zentrum für Experimentelle Biomedizin der Universität Würzburg

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Serious children’s infections also spreading in Switzerland

26.07.2017 | Health and Medicine

Biomarkers for identifying Tumor Aggressiveness

26.07.2017 | Life Sciences

NASA mission surfs through waves in space to understand space weather

25.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>