Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Images develop clinical applications for new DESI technology

09.10.2006
Purdue University researchers have created the first two-dimensional images of biological samples using a new mass spectrometry technique that furthers the technology's potential applications for the detection of diseases such as cancer.

The technology, desorption electrospray ionization, or DESI, measures characteristic chemical markers that distinguish diseased from non-diseased regions of tissue samples within a few seconds and has eliminated the need for samples to be treated with chemicals and specially contained.

This tool has a wide range of applications and could be used in the future to address many medical issues, said Graham Cooks, Purdue's Henry B. Hass Distinguished Professor of Analytical Chemistry in whose lab DESI was developed.

"This technology could be used to aid surgeons in precisely and completely removing cancerous tissue," he said. "With these images, we can see the exact location of tumor masses and can detect cancerous sites that are indistinguishable to the naked eye."

... more about:
»Cooks »DESI »IFA »Purdue' »Spectrometer »mass spectrometer

Current surgical methods rely on the trained eye of a pathologist who views stained tissue slices under a microscope to assess what tissue must be removed.

This study was the first to take the graphical data presented by DESI mass spectrometry and turn it into a two-dimensional image of the tissue, said Demian Ifa, a member of Cooks' research team.

"The ability to produce an image is a great advance," he said. "It is much more practical to have an image that can quickly and easily be interpreted. It brings the technology much closer to being ready for the clinical setting."

A paper detailing the study has been selected as a "very important paper" by the journal Angewandte Chemie and is currently posted online. Cooks, Ifa, Justin Wiseman, and Qingyu Song, all from Purdue's Department of Chemistry, authored the paper, which will be featured on the cover of the print publication. Less than 5 percent of the journal's manuscripts earn the very important paper designation, according to the journal.

Several technical papers have been published about DESI experiments since the method was announced two years ago as an alternative to traditional mass spectrometry techniques.

Conventional mass spectrometry requires chemical separations, manipulations of samples and containment in a vacuum chamber for assessment. DESI researchers modified a mass spectrometer, which is commonly used in biological sciences, to speed and simplify the time-consuming and labor-intensive analytical process, Ifa said.

Mass spectrometry works by first turning molecules into ions, or electrically charged versions of themselves, so they have mass and can be detected and analyzed. The DESI procedure does this by positively charging water molecules by spraying a stream of water in the presence of an electric field. These charged molecules contain an extra proton and are called ions. When the charged water droplets hit the surface of the sample being tested, they transfer their extra proton to molecules in the sample, turning them into ions. The ionized molecules are then vacuumed into the mass spectrometer, where the masses of the ions are measured and the material analyzed.

"Through analysis of the abundance of certain ions and mass ratios, the contents of the sample can be identified," Cooks said. "This information can be used to precisely determine the location of cancerous tissue and borders of tumors."

In this study, researchers mapped the distribution of fatty substances called lipids in a rat brain. The team was able to create a high-resolution image with a spatial resolution of less than 500 micrometers, meaning the image distinguishes small details separated by less than 1/100th of an inch. The researchers evaluated the sample by spraying small sections of it with the charged water droplets, obtaining data for each section and then combining the data sets to create an analysis of the sample as a whole, Ifa said. Software was used to map the information and create a two-dimensional image showing the distribution and intensity of selected ions.

The team is now working on the technique to improve the image resolution and has placed an instrument in the Indiana University School of Medicine, Cooks said.

Cooks' research team has also designed and built a portable mass spectrometer using the DESI technology. It is roughly the size of a shoebox and weighs about 40 pounds, compared to around 600 pounds for a conventional mass spectrometer. The portable instrument runs on batteries and can be carried anywhere, allowing the technology to more easily be used for field applications like explosives detection.

Cooks' most recent DESI research was conducted in Purdue's Bindley Biosciences Center at Discovery Park and is associated with Purdue's Center for Sensing Science and Technology.

Funding for this research came from the Office of Naval Research and the Indianapolis company Prosolia Inc., which is commercializing DESI.

Writer: Elizabeth K. Gardner, 765/494-2081, ekgardner@purdue.edu
Sources: R. Graham Cooks, (765) 494-5263, cooks@purdue.edu
Demian Ifa, (765) 496-3356, difa@purdue.edu
Purdue News Service: (765) 494-2096; purduenews@purdue.edu

Elizabeth K. Gardner | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.purdue.edu

Further reports about: Cooks DESI IFA Purdue' Spectrometer mass spectrometer

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Transport of molecular motors into cilia
28.03.2017 | Aarhus University

nachricht Asian dust providing key nutrients for California's giant sequoias
28.03.2017 | University of California - Riverside

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers shoot for success with simulations of laser pulse-material interactions

29.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Igniting a solar flare in the corona with lower-atmosphere kindling

29.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

As sea level rises, much of Honolulu and Waikiki vulnerable to groundwater inundation

29.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>