Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Jumping gene could provide non-viral alternative for gene therapy

27.09.2006
A jumping gene first identified in a cabbage-eating moth may one day provide a safer, target-specific alternative to viruses for gene therapy, researchers say.

They compared the ability of the four best-characterized jumping genes, or transposons, to insert themselves into a cell's DNA and produce a desired change, such as making the cell resistant to damage from radiation therapy.

They found the piggyBac transposon was five to 10 times better than the other circular pieces of DNA at making a home and a difference in several mammalian cell lines, including three human ones.

"If we want to add a therapeutic gene, we can put it within the transposon and use it to deliver the gene into the cell," says Dr. Joseph M. Kaminski, radiation oncologist at the Medical College of Georgia Cancer Center and a corresponding author on research published the week of Sept. 25 in the online Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition. "You can use these wherever retroviruses have been used."

... more about:
»Beauty »DNA »piggyBac »retroviruses

In addition to piggyBac, researchers looked at what was believed to be the most efficient transposon in mammalian cells, hyperactive Sleeping Beauty, first found "asleep" in fish. They also looked at Tol2, another fish transposon, and Mos1, found in insects.

The piggyBac transposon, which has close relatives in the human genome, is widely used to genetically modify insects. Sleeping Beauty has been used to correct hereditary diseases, including hemophilia, in a mouse model.

For this study, researchers used transposons to deliver an antibiotic-resistant gene. "It's a way of screening and seeing which transposon is better," Dr. Kaminski says. They found that while piggyBac might not work as efficiently as a virus, it put Sleeping Beauty to shame when it came to making cells antibiotic-resistant.

"Sleeping Beauty has captured the field as far as transposons to be used in mammals," says Dr. Stefan Moisyadi, molecular biologist, at the University of Hawaii and a corresponding author. "But by comparing different transposons, we showed Sleeping Beauty is far inferior to piggyBac."

Scientists have used viruses as a gene delivery mechanism for more than 20 years because of their adeptness at getting inside cells and inserting themselves in DNA. But efficiency comes at a price. Gene therapy trials have been halted because of major complications, including deaths. As examples, one patient died because of his immune response to an adenovirus and three children in another study developed leukemia because the virus inserted itself upstream of a cancer-causing gene.

"With viruses, you don't have control," says Dr. Kaminski. "People have tried to modify viruses for site-specific integration and have not been very successful. Once they get into the cell, they can insert wherever they want."

Dr. Kaminski's previous work, published in 2002 in The FASEB Journal, hypothesized that the integration site for transposons can be selected. "Typically, viruses and transposons will integrate anywhere along the genome," he says. "If they integrate anywhere, it can obviously cause harm. If we can target the integration, be able to insert the gene at a safe spot in the genome, that would be beneficial." He confirmed that targeting integration is possible in a paper he co-authored in 2005 also in The FASEB Journal. "We can do it in insects," says Dr. Moisyadi. "I think it's a short step to take it to a targeting mechanism we can use in humans."

Another clear benefit is that transposons are cheaper to produce and probably safer than viruses. For example, retroviruses use RNA to make DNA, an error-prone process that must occur before integration, Dr. Kaminski says. Also, viruses can't carry larger genes, such as the dystrophin gene, which could help correct muscular dystrophy. On the other hand, unlike retroviruses, transposons have to be coated with lipid to slip into cells.

Although piggyBac is not as successful as the virus at integrating into DNA, "we could potentially make a hyperactive version of piggyBac, like they did for Sleeping Beauty, which might be as good or better than retroviruses," Dr. Kaminski says. "I think we'll do it or somebody will. I think it's a safer method."

"At the moment, unless something new comes out, it's the only way to go because viruses have been killing people," says Dr. Moisyadi, who has avoided viruses in his transgenesis studies.

"One of our next goals is to use transposons to deliver a radio-protective gene, called manganese superoxide dismutase, to potentially protect normal tissue from radiation damage," Dr. Kaminski says.

In cancer, he suspects gene therapy will focus on this type of modification of normal tissue for protective purposes as well as manipulating the immune response. However, it has broad applications for correcting single gene disorders, such as hemophilia, sickle cell disease and muscular dystrophy.

Toni Baker | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mcg.edu

Further reports about: Beauty DNA piggyBac retroviruses

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Historical rainfall levels are significant in carbon emissions from soil
30.05.2017 | University of Texas at Austin

nachricht 3D printer inks from the woods
30.05.2017 | Empa - Eidgenössische Materialprüfungs- und Forschungsanstalt

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New Method of Characterizing Graphene

Scientists have developed a new method of characterizing graphene’s properties without applying disruptive electrical contacts, allowing them to investigate both the resistance and quantum capacitance of graphene and other two-dimensional materials. Researchers from the Swiss Nanoscience Institute and the University of Basel’s Department of Physics reported their findings in the journal Physical Review Applied.

Graphene consists of a single layer of carbon atoms. It is transparent, harder than diamond and stronger than steel, yet flexible, and a significantly better...

Im Focus: Strathclyde-led research develops world's highest gain high-power laser amplifier

The world's highest gain high power laser amplifier - by many orders of magnitude - has been developed in research led at the University of Strathclyde.

The researchers demonstrated the feasibility of using plasma to amplify short laser pulses of picojoule-level energy up to 100 millijoules, which is a 'gain'...

Im Focus: Can the immune system be boosted against Staphylococcus aureus by delivery of messenger RNA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a feared pathogen (MRSA, multi-resistant S. aureus) due to frequent resistances against many antibiotics, especially in hospital infections. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have identified immunological processes that prevent a successful immune response directed against the pathogenic agent. The delivery of bacterial proteins with RNA adjuvant or messenger RNA (mRNA) into immune cells allows the re-direction of the immune response towards an active defense against S. aureus. This could be of significant importance for the development of an effective vaccine. PLOS Pathogens has published these research results online on 25 May 2017.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium that colonizes by far more than half of the skin and the mucosa of adults, usually without causing infections....

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

3D printer inks from the woods

30.05.2017 | Life Sciences

How circadian clocks communicate with each other

30.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Graphene and quantum dots put in motion a CMOS-integrated camera that can see the invisible

30.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>