Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

£14.9 million award to MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit

21.09.2006
The Medical Research Council Protein Phosphorylation Unit at the University of Dundee has had its funding for the next five years almost doubled to £14.9 million after an overwhelmingly positive review of its activities.

The MRC Council has approved a recommendation from its Physiological Systems and Clinical Sciences Board to provide an increased budget of £14.9 million over the five year period April 2007-2012.

The Unit received funding of £7.5 million for the period 2002-2007.

After a rigorous review which involved seeking the opinions of 30 international experts in the field, the MRC Council gave the highest possible 6.0 rating for the Unit's recent work and future proposals.

... more about:
»MRC »Protein »phosphorylation

The Council also approved the appointment of Professor Dario Alessi as Deputy Director of the Unit.

"This major new commitment from the MRC to the Unit in Dundee is a tremendous boost, and recognises the pre-eminence we have achieved in this field worldwide," said Professor Sir Philip Cohen, Director of the MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit.

"The additional funding will allow us to expand our cutting-edge research programmes - which aim to understand the causes of global diseases such as arthritis, cancer, diabetes, hypertension and Parkinson's - and to use this information to facilitate the development of drugs to treat these conditions in partnership with the six major pharmaceutical companies with whom we collaborate."

When the new positions awarded are filled, the MRC Protein Phosphorylation Unit will have nine Programme Leaders and 115 staff and account for 16% of the on-going research in the College of Life Sciences at Dundee.

Over the past five years some of the highlights of the Unit's research have included the explanation of how a tumour suppressor called LKB1 prevents cancers from forming, the validation of the enzyme PDK1 as a key target for the development of an anti-cancer drug, the discovery of why mutations in an enzyme called WNK1 cause an inherited hypertension syndrome and the identification of new drug targets to treat chronic inflammatory diseases.

The MRC Council also announced that Dr Nick Morrice, Head of Proteomics in the Unit would be promoted from Band 3 to Band 2 and Dr Kei Sakamoto, Head of the Unit's Molecular Physiology Laboratory from Band 4 to Band 3, both effective April 2007.

The Council also gave approval for the Unit to recruit a biologically-focused Programme Leader with significant X-ray crystallographic expertise, a position which has just been advertised.

Roddy Isles | alfa
Further information:
http://www.dundee.ac.uk

Further reports about: MRC Protein phosphorylation

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Topologische Quantenchemie
21.07.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe

nachricht Topological Quantum Chemistry
21.07.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Chemische Physik fester Stoffe

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>