Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Abertay team devises chemical-free disinfectant system

30.08.2006
Abertay team devises chemical-free disinfectant system

One famous disinfectant’s claim to kill 99.9% of germs stone-dead has entered advertising folklore, but a team from the University of Abertay Dundee has gone literally a thousand times better.

Abertay researchers have devised a method of killing bacteria in water using microbubbles and ozone that has succeeded in destroying 99.9999% of E.coli bacteria in a given volume of water.

Ozone is increasingly used as an alternative to chlorination in the modern food and drink industry, but normally only eliminates 99.99% of bacteria. The Abertay team’s results from combining ozone with microbubbles are generating considerable interest among manufacturers seeking a means of ensuring ultrapure and almost completely bacteria-free water for use in food processing, without using potentially harmful chemicals.

... more about:
»bacteria »hydrodynamic »ozone

Rashmi Chand, a PhD student in Abertay’s School of Contemporary Sciences, employed hydrodynamic cavitation technology which pumps water very fast along a pipe and then through a small hole with such force that microbubbles or cavities are produced. These bubbles then implode, creating tiny pockets of high pressure and high temperature that kill bacteria.

The hydrodynamic cavitation by itself killed off 99 million out of 100 million E.coli cells in a body of water. Working with Abertay’s Professor David Bremner, Rashmi then investigated the effect of adding ozone and discovered that two bursts of the gas during the process further reduced the E.coli count to fewer than 100 cells.

Rashmi explained: “Food is a necessary for life, and safe food is essential for human health. In processing the food, ultrapure and completely bacterial free water is of prime importance.

“Conventional chemical disinfection techniques, particularly chlorination, suffer from disadvantages such as the formation of possibly carcinogenic by-products. Our method of disinfection by means of ozone and hydrodynamic cavitation opens up the possibility of eliminating or drastically reducing the use of these disinfecting chemicals,” she added.

The project was supported by the Food Processing Faraday Partnership Ltd (FPFP), which aims to promote improved interactions between the UK science, engineering and technology base and the UK food manufacturing industry.

FPFP were interested in the specialized ultrasound and hydrodynamic equipment available only at Abertay and provided a small grant to fund the acquisition of an ozoniser and enable the six-month research project to go ahead.

The Abertay team’s results are due to be published in a scientific journal in the near future.

Kevin Coe | alfa
Further information:
http://www.abertay.ac.uk

Further reports about: bacteria hydrodynamic ozone

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Cryo-electron microscopy achieves unprecedented resolution using new computational methods
24.03.2017 | DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

nachricht How cheetahs stay fit and healthy
24.03.2017 | Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V.

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>