Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Abertay team devises chemical-free disinfectant system

30.08.2006
Abertay team devises chemical-free disinfectant system

One famous disinfectant’s claim to kill 99.9% of germs stone-dead has entered advertising folklore, but a team from the University of Abertay Dundee has gone literally a thousand times better.

Abertay researchers have devised a method of killing bacteria in water using microbubbles and ozone that has succeeded in destroying 99.9999% of E.coli bacteria in a given volume of water.

Ozone is increasingly used as an alternative to chlorination in the modern food and drink industry, but normally only eliminates 99.99% of bacteria. The Abertay team’s results from combining ozone with microbubbles are generating considerable interest among manufacturers seeking a means of ensuring ultrapure and almost completely bacteria-free water for use in food processing, without using potentially harmful chemicals.

... more about:
»bacteria »hydrodynamic »ozone

Rashmi Chand, a PhD student in Abertay’s School of Contemporary Sciences, employed hydrodynamic cavitation technology which pumps water very fast along a pipe and then through a small hole with such force that microbubbles or cavities are produced. These bubbles then implode, creating tiny pockets of high pressure and high temperature that kill bacteria.

The hydrodynamic cavitation by itself killed off 99 million out of 100 million E.coli cells in a body of water. Working with Abertay’s Professor David Bremner, Rashmi then investigated the effect of adding ozone and discovered that two bursts of the gas during the process further reduced the E.coli count to fewer than 100 cells.

Rashmi explained: “Food is a necessary for life, and safe food is essential for human health. In processing the food, ultrapure and completely bacterial free water is of prime importance.

“Conventional chemical disinfection techniques, particularly chlorination, suffer from disadvantages such as the formation of possibly carcinogenic by-products. Our method of disinfection by means of ozone and hydrodynamic cavitation opens up the possibility of eliminating or drastically reducing the use of these disinfecting chemicals,” she added.

The project was supported by the Food Processing Faraday Partnership Ltd (FPFP), which aims to promote improved interactions between the UK science, engineering and technology base and the UK food manufacturing industry.

FPFP were interested in the specialized ultrasound and hydrodynamic equipment available only at Abertay and provided a small grant to fund the acquisition of an ozoniser and enable the six-month research project to go ahead.

The Abertay team’s results are due to be published in a scientific journal in the near future.

Kevin Coe | alfa
Further information:
http://www.abertay.ac.uk

Further reports about: bacteria hydrodynamic ozone

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New risk factors for anxiety disorders
24.02.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers
24.02.2017 | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>