Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Scientists develop a technique to detect a streptococcus passed from mother to foetus during delivery

29.08.2006
Micro-organism Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus transmitted vertically from mother to foetus) and the Universidad de Granada have been closely linked from more than twenty years.

In the nineties, a research group of the University Hospital Virgen de las Nieves gave rise to Granada Medium (a technique to detect the presence of the streptococcus in the mother). Recently, the same group, in collaboration with the departments of Microbiology and Organic Chemistry and the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Service of the University of Granada [http://www.ugr.es], have isolated and identified the pigment that colours this micro-organism to detect its presence.

Perinatal infection by Streptococcus agalactiae affects approximately three of every 1,000 newborns alive, with a mortality rate of 50 per cent in the seventies which has reduced to 4-5 per cent due to the advances in neonatology. This micro-organism provokes in the newborn diseases such as septicaemia, pneumonia or meningitis, and the transmission from mother to foetus takes place during delivery or water breaking.

American scientists proved more than 20 years ago that the intravenous administration of antibiotics started at least fours hours before delivery is a good strategy to avoid early neonatal infection. For this reason, it was necessary to determine previously if the micro-organism was or not present in the mother’s body. To this aim, the researchers from Granada devised a very simple technique, applied in health centres and known as Medio Granada. This system, unique in the world, is currently manufactured in Spain (by the Biomedics company, in Madrid), Germany (Becton Dickinson) and the USA (Hardy, Diagnostics).

... more about:
»Streptococcus »agalactiae »foetus

Streptococcus detection

The other great achievement of the scientists of the UGR [http://www.ugr.es] related to the Streptococcus agalactiae has provisionally been called Granadaeno, a new red pigment which, applied in the Medio Granada, colours the streptococcus if it is present in the mother’s organism.

The molecular structure of the Granadaeno has been solved by a research group made up by members of the UGR departments of Microbiology (professor Alfonso Ruiz-Bravo López) and Organic Chemistry (professor Juan Manuel Cuerva Carvajal), and the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Services (doctor Alí Haidour Benami) and Microbiology (directed by doctor Manuel de la Rosa Fraile) of the University Hospital Virgen de las Nieves.

In order to detect the carriers of Streptococcus agalactiae, the scientists advise to carry out a vaginal and rectal culture to all the pregnant women in the 35-37 weeks of pregnancy, preferably in the week 36, if there is a there is suspicion of chorioamnionitis.

Antonio Marín Ruiz | alfa
Further information:
http://www.ugr.es
http://prensa.ugr.es/prensa/investigacion/index.php

Further reports about: Streptococcus agalactiae foetus

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Bare bones: Making bones transparent
27.04.2017 | California Institute of Technology

nachricht Link Discovered between Immune System, Brain Structure and Memory
26.04.2017 | Universität Basel

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Making lightweight construction suitable for series production

More and more automobile companies are focusing on body parts made of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). However, manufacturing and repair costs must be further reduced in order to make CFRP more economical in use. Together with the Volkswagen AG and five other partners in the project HolQueSt 3D, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) has developed laser processes for the automatic trimming, drilling and repair of three-dimensional components.

Automated manufacturing processes are the basis for ultimately establishing the series production of CFRP components. In the project HolQueSt 3D, the LZH has...

Im Focus: Wonder material? Novel nanotube structure strengthens thin films for flexible electronics

Reflecting the structure of composites found in nature and the ancient world, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have synthesized thin carbon nanotube (CNT) textiles that exhibit both high electrical conductivity and a level of toughness that is about fifty times higher than copper films, currently used in electronics.

"The structural robustness of thin metal films has significant importance for the reliable operation of smart skin and flexible electronics including...

Im Focus: Deep inside Galaxy M87

The nearby, giant radio galaxy M87 hosts a supermassive black hole (BH) and is well-known for its bright jet dominating the spectrum over ten orders of magnitude in frequency. Due to its proximity, jet prominence, and the large black hole mass, M87 is the best laboratory for investigating the formation, acceleration, and collimation of relativistic jets. A research team led by Silke Britzen from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, has found strong indication for turbulent processes connecting the accretion disk and the jet of that galaxy providing insights into the longstanding problem of the origin of astrophysical jets.

Supermassive black holes form some of the most enigmatic phenomena in astrophysics. Their enormous energy output is supposed to be generated by the...

Im Focus: A Quantum Low Pass for Photons

Physicists in Garching observe novel quantum effect that limits the number of emitted photons.

The probability to find a certain number of photons inside a laser pulse usually corresponds to a classical distribution of independent events, the so-called...

Im Focus: Microprocessors based on a layer of just three atoms

Microprocessors based on atomically thin materials hold the promise of the evolution of traditional processors as well as new applications in the field of flexible electronics. Now, a TU Wien research team led by Thomas Müller has made a breakthrough in this field as part of an ongoing research project.

Two-dimensional materials, or 2D materials for short, are extremely versatile, although – or often more precisely because – they are made up of just one or a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Expert meeting “Health Business Connect” will connect international medical technology companies

20.04.2017 | Event News

Wenn der Computer das Gehirn austrickst

18.04.2017 | Event News

7th International Conference on Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics in Freiburg on April 3-5, 2017

03.04.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Bare bones: Making bones transparent

27.04.2017 | Life Sciences

Study offers new theoretical approach to describing non-equilibrium phase transitions

27.04.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

From volcano's slope, NASA instrument looks sky high and to the future

27.04.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>