Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Gluing Cells - Precise sticking of living cells on carriers by microelectrochemical methods

03.08.2006
The adhesion and growth of cells on solid carriers is required for many applications. Laboratory-cultured tissues, diagnosis chips, and biosensors all have something in common: Cells need to be attached to the surface.

Suitable surfaces that induce the adhesion of cells are available, yet, there is no simple method to attach cells onto carriers at defined positions, such as in a particular pattern. The ordering of different cell types in a precise alignment was, until now, extremely complicated. Researchers from the University of Oldenburg have now developed a simple microelectrochemical method by which cells can be "glued" to an exact position on a carrier. Chuan Zhao, Irene Witte, and Gunther Wittstock have also shown that it is possible to adhere, in the same way, a different type of cell at a different location.

The carrier or chip is covered by a continuous thin coating of a material that has ethylene glycol units as free end groups. On such a coated surface, however, it is almost impossible for cells to stick. The Oldenburg research team had found, previously, that treatment with an oxidizing substance such as bromine instantly changes the antistick surface to one that is attractive to cells. This effect can also be applied to small and specific areas if the bromine is directly aimed to come into contact with these defined surface areas. To achieve this, the help of microelectrodes and a solution that contains bromide ions is required. The electrode is positioned close over selected positions of the carrier, and a short potential pulse is applied. As long as the microelectrode is on, the bromide ions will be converted into bromine. The bromine acts on the local area of the surface, however, too little bromine is formed to react extensively with the whole surface. Like a pen, the microelectrode "draws" a pattern on the carrier. If the carrier is incubated with a protein solution, then all the sites that were previously treated by the microelectrode are deposited with the protein from the solution. It is in these positions that the cells then settle. In this way, the researchers were able to cultivate human fibroblasts in a particular pattern. A second fibroblast population could be specifically adhered at further points by repeated electrochemical treatment.

Says Wittstock: "By stepwise site-directed introduction of different cell types onto the surface, our method could facilitate the formation of micropatterned co-cultures and, therefore, contribute to in vitro investigations of multicellular interactions and to tissue engineering".

Gunther Wittstock | alfa
Further information:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/anie.200601151

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Cells communicate in a dynamic code
19.02.2018 | California Institute of Technology

nachricht Studying mitosis' structure to understand the inside of cancer cells
19.02.2018 | Biophysical Society

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Contacting the molecular world through graphene nanoribbons

19.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

When Proteins Shake Hands

19.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

Cells communicate in a dynamic code

19.02.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>