Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Campus Vienna Biocenter: Training & Dissemination Centre on RNA Viruses launched

30.06.2006
A newly established Training and Dissemination Centre (TDcentre) will contribute significantly to the rapid diffusion of scientific knowledge that is being generated by an EU-Integrated Project on RNA Viruses. The TDcentre has now launched its activities with a workshop at the Campus Vienna Biocenter on 28. June. Participants from 15 countries exchanged ideas and facts about the structural analysis of protein domains.

Integrated Projects (IP) are one of the largest EU-Research instruments under the outgoing 6th Framework Programme. The Vizier IP on RNA viruses received funding of more than EUR 12 Mio. and is with its 25 participating laboratories from 12 nations a good example for the large size of this kind of project. While the collaboration of so many participants will certainly generate novel ideas and solutions to scientific problems it also requires proactive dissemination of this – even within the project.

Know-How to Disseminate

With the establishment of a centre entirely dedicated to training and dissemination Vizier demonstrates strong commitment to this end. The TDcentre is located at the Department of Biomolecular Structural Chemistry that is member of both, the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna and the Max F. Perutz Laboratories. Here the TDcentre will offer congresses, workshops and training courses. The department's Group Leader in Macromolecular Crystallography and TDcentre's manager Prof. Kristina Djinovic-Carugo commented: "During the next two and a half years our TDcentre targets both the Vizier participants and the wider scientific community. By doing so we share scientific facts and in-depth details of methodologies prior to publication. This, as well as the face-to-face interaction, will significantly accelerate the scientific progress in the study of RNA viruses."

RNA viruses are the causative agent of serious diseases such as ebola, yellow fever, HIV, hepatitis and of common infections such as influenza and colds. Vizier will identify new therapeutic targets of RNA viruses by carefully analyzing its replicative machinery. Although virus-specific, the replicative machinery is essential for the virus' propagation and offers an attractive target for novel therapies.

Small Target - Big Impact

In order to identify the parts of the replicative machinery where therapies will be most efficient Vizier will analyze the structure of the relevant proteins at very high resolutions. To meet this challenge, Vizier is also developing and validating new tools for X-ray crystallography and protein production. This strong focus on structural analysis was one of the main reasons for appointing the Viennese Dept. of Biomolecular Structural Chemistry as TDcentre. The department is internationally recognized for its strength in optical and Nuclear Magnetic Resonsance (NMR) spectroscopy, crystallography and bioinformatics.

Already during the kick-off workshop of Vizier's TDcentre at the Department, key issues regarding the structural analysis of protein domains were discussed. Entitled "Definition of Protein Domains and Their Likelihood of Crystallization" the workshop attracted over 80 participants from 15 nations. During the workshops' three days and 18 events between 28th - 30th of June, all participants agreed that this kind of direct dissemination of scientific advances within a project is a very important step for accelerating scientific progress.

Till C. Jelitto | alfa
Further information:
http://www.mfpl.ac.at/index.php?cid=58
http://www.prd.at

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht The dense vessel network regulates formation of thrombocytes in the bone marrow
25.07.2017 | Rudolf-Virchow-Zentrum für Experimentelle Biomedizin der Universität Würzburg

nachricht Fungi that evolved to eat wood offer new biomass conversion tool
25.07.2017 | University of Massachusetts at Amherst

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA mission surfs through waves in space to understand space weather

25.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Strength of tectonic plates may explain shape of the Tibetan Plateau, study finds

25.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

The dense vessel network regulates formation of thrombocytes in the bone marrow

25.07.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>