Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

‘Minerva’ officially opened at the Babraham Research Campus

30.06.2006
Babraham Bioscience Technologies Ltd (BBT) today officially opened its new commercial building, ‘Minerva’, at the Babraham Research Campus. Named after the Roman goddess of wisdom, Minerva provides grow-on units for early stage bioventures as they make the transition out of incubation facilities and is part of BBT’s innovative approach to supporting start-up and early stage biomedical ventures in the region.

Mr Phil Willis MP, Chairman of the House of Commons’ Science and Technology Select Committee, who unveiled the plaque said, “It is a huge privilege to officially open the new ‘Minerva’ research facility which offers emerging biotech companies state of the art facilities to bring excellent science to the market. This facility is a superb example of how government funding can stimulate knowledge transfer by sponsoring direct links between academia and industry and stimulating wealth creation in the regions.”

Minerva is the first of three BioDevelopment buildings, offering flexible laboratory and office accommodation, which are anticipated will stimulate and facilitate the knowledge transfer process from research to commercial exploitation on the campus. Dr David Hardman, CEO of BBT said, “This BioDevelopment building is the latest development in our Babraham Research Campus strategy to integrate world class science with innovative bioventures to exploit new technologies relating to human healthcare. This building enables companies to expand into new facilities on flexible terms, a unique proposition in the region. The campus has been home to over 40 of the region’s biotechnology companies since it opened in 1998 and BBT will start a new Bioincubator building in September. The continued success emphasises the role our knowledge-based campus can play in promoting biosciences for regional development.”

Cambridge Biotechnology Ltd, a drug-discovery research company developing novel therapeutics for the treatment of pain, inflammation and obesity, is one of the four companies residing in Minerva. Dr Peter Richardson, Managing Director of CBT said, "Moving to new facilities at Babraham represents a major new phase in the growth of CBT. The new laboratories will provide CBT's drug discovery teams with excellent working conditions and will ensure optimal efficiency and safety for all its research staff. A location on the Babraham Research Campus also benefits from the proximity of a host of innovative biotech companies and prestigious academic groups which provides an optimal environment for a company such as CBT to thrive."

Also in Minerva are NovaThera Ltd, a spin-out from Imperial College London that is pioneering applications of biomaterials and stem cell biology for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, and Stem Cell Sciences plc, an international company with centres in the United Kingdom, Australia, Japan and the USA. Active in the stem cell research field since 1994, the company is principally focused on expertise to grow, differentiate, select and purify stem cells. Cyclacel, the Dundee-based biopharmaceutical company dedicated to the discovery, development and commercialisation of novel, mechanism-targeted drugs to treat human cancers, moved into Minerva from the Bioincubator facilities earlier this year.

Claire Cockcroft | alfa
Further information:
http://www.babraham.ac.uk

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Fingerprint' technique spots frog populations at risk from pollution
27.03.2017 | Lancaster University

nachricht Parallel computation provides deeper insight into brain function
27.03.2017 | Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Northern oceans pumped CO2 into the atmosphere

27.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

Fingerprint' technique spots frog populations at risk from pollution

27.03.2017 | Life Sciences

Big data approach to predict protein structure

27.03.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>