Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Bacteria, beware: New finding about E coli could block infections, lead to better treatments

27.06.2006
A newly discovered receptor in a strain of Escherichia coli can be blocked to avert infection, a finding that might aid in developing better therapies to treat bacterial infections resulting in food poisoning, diarrhea or plague.

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center are the first to identify the receptor, known as QseC, used by a diarrhea-causing strain of E coli to receive signals from human flora and hormones in the intestine and express virulence genes to initiate infection.

In a study made available online this week and in an upcoming issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers describe how they used phentolamine, an alpha blocker drug used to treat hypertension, to successfully impede signaling to the receptor. Without such signals, bacteria then pass blindly through the digestive tract without infecting cells.

"This receptor is found in many pathogens, so we can use this knowledge to design specific antagonists to block bacterial infections," said Dr. Vanessa Sperandio, senior author of the study and assistant professor of microbiology at UT Southwestern.

Prior research by Dr. Sperandio found that when a person ingests the more virulent enterohemorrhagic E coli, or EHEC – which is usually transmitted through contaminated food such as raw meat – it travels peacefully through the digestive tract until reaching the intestine. There, however, chemicals produced by the friendly gastrointestinal microbial flora and the human hormones epinephrine and norepinephrine alert the bacteria to its location.

This cellular cross talk triggers a cascade of genetic activations prompting EHEC to colonize and translocate toxins into cells, altering the makeup of the cells and robbing the body of nutrients. An infected person may develop bloody diarrhea or even hemolytic uremic syndrome, which can cause death in immune-weakened people, the elderly and young children.

The new study identifies QseC as the specific receptor by which EHEC senses the signals. When the receptor binds to signaling molecules, the bacterium can infect cells.

Researchers tested the capacity of adrenergic antagonists, drugs such as alpha and beta blockers, to disrupt the receptor's sensing ability. They found that phentolamine binds to the QseC receptor and occupies the pocket that the receptor would use to recognize the host epinephrine and norepinephrine signals – thus blocking the QseC receptor from sensing the signals and preventing it from being able to express its virulence genes in cells.

This knowledge opens the door to further understanding of the signaling processes between microbes and humans and to the development of novel treatments of bacterial infections with antagonists to these signals, Dr. Sperandio said.

New therapies are important because treating some bacterial infections with conventional antibiotics can cause the release of more toxins and may worsen disease outcome.

That importance is magnified because of the QseC receptor's existence in other types of bacteria, including, Shigella, which causes dysentery; Salmonella, which causes food poisoning and gastroenteritis; and Yersinia, which causes bubonic plague. Those are all emerging infectious diseases that afflict thousands of people each year in the United States and worldwide, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"Overuse of antibiotics has led bacteria to develop resistance to antibiotics, so a novel type of therapy is needed," Dr. Sperandio said.

Cliff Despres | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.utsouthwestern.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Programming cells with computer-like logic
27.07.2017 | Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard

nachricht Identified the component that allows a lethal bacteria to spread resistance to antibiotics
27.07.2017 | Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona)

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Physicists Design Ultrafocused Pulses

Physicists working with researcher Oriol Romero-Isart devised a new simple scheme to theoretically generate arbitrarily short and focused electromagnetic fields. This new tool could be used for precise sensing and in microscopy.

Microwaves, heat radiation, light and X-radiation are examples for electromagnetic waves. Many applications require to focus the electromagnetic fields to...

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Programming cells with computer-like logic

27.07.2017 | Life Sciences

Identified the component that allows a lethal bacteria to spread resistance to antibiotics

27.07.2017 | Life Sciences

Malaria Already Endemic in the Mediterranean by the Roman Period

27.07.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>