Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Research links protein to breast-cancer migration

13.06.2006
Scientists have moved a step closer to understanding how breast cancer spreads to other parts of the body, thanks to research published this week.

The University of Manchester team has discovered a protein potentially involved in the spread or ‘metastatic progression’ of tumours.

The researchers believe their findings could lead to new approaches to treating breast cancer as blocking the protein’s actions has the potential to stop cancerous cells migrating.

“What we have identified is a new role for a protein called LPP,” explained Professor Andrew Sharrocks, who headed the research team.

“Until now, this protein was only thought to function at the cell periphery but we have shown that it works in conjunction with another protein – PEA3 – in the cell nucleus.

“PEA3 has already been implicated in the spread of breast cancer but we have found that the LPP molecule is essential for the correct function of PEA3.”

“If we can target the LPP protein and stop it from working in cancerous cells, we have a possible new route to therapy.”

The research, published in the scientific journal Molecular and Cellular Biology, may have implications for other cancer systems.

“Benign tumours remain in one part of the body and are relatively easy to treat through surgery,” said Professor Sharrocks, who is based in the University’s Faculty of Life Sciences.

“But metastases – malignant cancers that spread to other parts of the body – can be much more problematic.

“Our research is potentially fundamental to all types of cancers and has the potential to offer alternative therapies to stop cancers spreading to other organs in the body.”

News of the scientific breakthrough comes as the University announced Breast Cancer Campaign funding for two other research projects worth nearly £300,000.

Dr Andrew Gilmore, also in the Faculty of Life Sciences, has been awarded a grant of £146,000 to examine in more detail a process called ‘anoikis’.

Anoikis is the process whereby the body ambushes and kills roving cells that have gone ‘AWOL’ and are moving around the body without permission – like breast-cancer cells that spread from the breast to form tumours in other parts of the body.

Current breast-cancer treatments have been designed to kick start the anoikis process and kill these rogue cells. But the cancer cells are clever and learn how to avoid being destroyed, which means these treatments no longer work and patients often see their breast cancer return.

Dr Gilmore said: “Understanding more about how the body’s natural defences work and why breast-cancer cells can avoid them will help develop new drugs that can kill invasive cells that have become resistant to standard treatment.”

A further £143,000 has been awarded by the charity to Dr Keith Brennan, again in Life Sciences, to uncover how a group of proteins called Notch are able to protect breast-cancer cells from dying.

“Notch proteins appear to shield breast-cancer cells from the body’s natural defences and also from being destroyed by chemotherapy,” said Dr Brennan.

“This research will help to uncover exactly how Notch proteins have this effect and whether inhibiting their action may be one way of making chemotherapy treatments more effective.”

Pamela Goldberg, Chief Executive of Breast Cancer Campaign, added: “The spread of breast-cancer cells to other areas of the body is the single most important factor in breast-cancer mortality.

“When breast-cancer cells become invasive they become less responsive to treatment and the disease becomes more difficult for a clinician to manage.

“Both these studies could help to develop new drugs which kill breast-cancer cells before they have an opportunity to spread.”

Aeron Haworth | alfa
Further information:
http://www.manchester.ac.uk

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Warming ponds could accelerate climate change
21.02.2017 | University of Exeter

nachricht An alternative to opioids? Compound from marine snail is potent pain reliever
21.02.2017 | University of Utah

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Start codons in DNA may be more numerous than previously thought

21.02.2017 | Life Sciences

An alternative to opioids? Compound from marine snail is potent pain reliever

21.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Warming ponds could accelerate climate change

21.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>