Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Glycobiology: the sheer versatility of sugars

02.06.2006
Glycobiology is a hot new topic, a science that has arrived and blossomed in the last decade.

The latest issue of The Biochemist puts glycobiology in perspective with an authoritative article on its origin by Professor Raymond Dwek and with reports from the cutting edge of this fascinating and vitally important new discipline. Read how it is making significant discoveries in the fields of molecular biology and in the fight against disease.

Also: the discovery of muscle biochemistry, how the structure of immunoglobin was found and what John Prescott is really like.

All this and much more in the latest issue of The Biochemist.

Glycobiology at Oxford
By Raymond Dwek
How the study of oligosaccharides became glycobiology and became firmly established as part of mainstream biochemistry.
Recognizing glycans
By Kurt Drickamer and Maureen E. Taylor
Many well-understood examples of glycan-receptor interactions exist, but are there enough receptors to account for the number of glycans that are being identified?
Protein-carbohydrate interactions
By Nathan Sharon
Proteins that possess the ability to bind carbohydrates specifically and reversibly abound in nature, being present in all living organisms, from viruses to humans.
Glycobiology and medicine
By Pauline M. Rudd and Raymond A. Dwek
The bright future for high throughput glycan analysis and disease markers.
Glycobiology and viruses
By Nicole Zitzmann, Joanne M. O’Leary and Raymond Dwek
Most aspects of glycobiology play important roles in the ’life’ of viruses, for example in the correct folding of their envelope glycoproteins as well as in immune representation and escape.
Raman optical activity
By Laurence D. Barron
A new light on proteins, carbohydrates and glycoproteins.
Q & A:
Interview with S. V. Perry
Flexing their muscles
By Michael P. Walsh
The Biochemical Journal classic papers of S. V. Perry and co-workers.
In the blood
By Michael A. Kerr
Rodney Porter and the structure of immunoglobulin.
The trap hypothesis
By Guy S. Salvesen
The classic Biochemical Journal paper of Alan Barrett and Phyllis Starkey.
48 Q & A:
Q. Is John Prescott a nice guy to work with?
A. Yes; the image of John given by the press and the media is very unfair.
Our exclusive interview with Phyllis Starkey, MP
Obituary
Helen Muir 1920-2005
By Tim Hardingham

Mark Burgess | alfa
Further information:
http://www.biochemist.org/bio

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Molecular microscopy illuminates molecular motor motion
26.07.2017 | Penn State

nachricht New virus discovered in migratory bird in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
26.07.2017 | Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

CCNY physicists master unexplored electron property

26.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Molecular microscopy illuminates molecular motor motion

26.07.2017 | Life Sciences

Large-Mouthed Fish Was Top Predator After Mass Extinction

26.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>