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Researchers at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center uncover clue to explain invasive brain tumors

12.01.2006


Researchers at the Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center have uncovered a clue to explain the invasive nature of an aggressive kind of brain tumor called glioblastoma multiforme, or gliomas, and their findings are published in this week’s online edition of the journal Oncogene.



Reid Thompson, M.D., director of Neurosurgical Oncology, and his colleague, Moneeb Ehtesham, M.D., assistant professor of Neurological Surgery and Cancer Biology, found a key receptor plays a role in the spread of this tumor.

"We looked at CXCR4, a molecule which has been shown to play a role in other cancers, and found that the more metastatic aggression relates to this molecule. So, we looked at whether this molecule governed this invasion in gliomas," said Ehtesham.


CXCR4 is a receptor that is found in white blood cells and has been shown to play a key role in regulating the movement of cells in the immune system. Finding something to inhibit CXCR4 could potentially lead to treatment options to prevent cancerous cells from moving to other organs.

In animal models, Thompson and Ehtesham found CXCR4 can, in fact, be linked to cell invasion in glioblastoma. "If we look at a brain cancer model in rodents we can see a difference in CXCR4 expression in invasive and non-invasive cells. We found CXCR4 was expressed in the non-invasive cells, but was much higher in invasive cells, or cells from the core of the tumor and cells that had migrated away," said Ehtesham. Thompson said it was significantly higher, "up to thirty- to fortyfold higher in the invasive cells," he added.

Next, Thompson and Ehtesham looked at CXCR4 more closely, in dish studies. They wanted to determine whether cells that have CXCR4 invade more than cells without the molecule. They induced glioblastoma and forced the cells to migrate, comparing migrating brain tumor cells with the cells at the origin of the cancer. Their findings were consistent with the animal studies -- CXCR4 was again much higher in the migrating cancer cells than in the core of the tumor. Only this time, even higher – sixty- to eightyfold higher, according to Ehtesham.

The researchers then shut down the CXCR4 function of the receptor. What they found was puzzling. Shutting down the CXCR4 weakened its ability to migrate, but it didn’t stop it altogether, just significantly impaired it. "Cancer is finding a way to move around the brain, said Thompson. "This tells us this receptor plays an important role in mediating cell invasion of gliomas," he added.

Ehtesham said it is one of the contributors, but there are many others. The discovery could help experts target new therapies for the aggressive brain tumors. Several studies are under way to look at targeting molecules to specifically shut down CXCR4 for other cancers, but Thompson said no one has linked its expression to the invasive behavior of brain tumor cells, until now. Ehtesham said they are now looking at a neutralizing antibody that binds to CXCR4 and works by sequestering the invasive molecule, as well as small-interference RNA, which is like silencing it by shutting down the expression of the receptor.

"Now we may have a way of blocking the process that allows cancer to spread in the brain, but we will need to know more than just how to shut down these migratory cells to fight this cancer. This is just another tool in our arsenal," said Thompson.

Thompson and Ehtesham are eager to take this research into human trials soon and hope to see benefits for the 17,000-18,000 Americans facing a newly diagnosed glioma each year.

Heather Hall | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.vanderbilt.edu

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