Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New model of prostate cancer helps identify promising pain treatment

02.12.2005


Researchers have developed a new line of prostate cancer cells that they hope will provide a better model to study the disease.



This new cancer-cell line has already provided some help. One new study in mice identified a promising possible therapy to reduce skeletal pain that accompanies prostate cancer. Scientists found that a substance called anti-nerve growth factor appeared to be more effective in controlling pain in mice than even morphine.

But the work would not have been possible without the new cell line, said Tom Rosol , a study co-author and a professor of veterinary medicine at Ohio State University.


Armed with this new cell line, scientists will be able to more directly study how prostate cancer affects the body, said Rosol, whose laboratory developed the cell line.

Metastatic bone tumors are a common manifestation in patients with late-stage breast cancer or prostate cancer. “Metastasis” means that cancer has spread from its original site to other areas of the body. But breast cancer typically destroys bone at tumor sites, whereas prostate cancer tumors that spread to bone induce abnormal bone growth.

Currently, most models used to study prostate cancer do not mimic the human condition and the resulting bone metastases. Most of these models really mimic the spread of breast cancer since the bone metastases in that disease are associated with bone loss rather than bone growth.

“Even though there is more bone at the sites of prostate cancer tumors, this formation still damages the bone,” said Rosol, who is also dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine at Ohio State . “The new growth compresses nerves, making it terribly painful for the patient.”

The results appear in a recent issue of the journal Cancer Research. The study was led by Patrick Mantyh, a professor of preventive sciences at the University of Minnesota.

Only two mammals are known to develop prostate cancer –- men and dogs. Rosol’s laboratory created a cell line from prostate tumors that had developed in a dog’s bones. The researchers call this line of cells ACE-1.

In the current study, researchers at the University of Minnesota injected the ACE-1 cells directly into the femurs, or thigh bones, of male mice. These mice were specially bred to lack an immune system, leaving them vulnerable to developing prostate cancer. While the femur is the biggest bone in the body -- and therefore the easiest to study in this case -- prostate cancer can affect any bone in the body.

It took about a week for the prostate tumors to develop in the mice. At that point, the researchers began treating mice with anti-nerve growth factor (NGF). Anti-NGF is a molecule that naturally occurs in the body, where it promotes the survival and growth of nerves. An additional group of mice was treated with morphine. Control mice, which also had prostate cancer, were given a sterile saline solution instead of either anti-NGF or morphine.

The researchers wanted to know what kind of effect, if any, anti-NGF had on pain-related behaviors, tumor growth, bone formation and bone destruction in the mice.

The researchers watched mice at different points in the study to see if they showed any kind of pain-related behavior. The researchers kept track of how much time each mouse spent favoring its affected leg – how often the mouse lifted its leg while standing still, and for how long it held this leg aloft.

Mice treated with anti-NGF spent less time favoring their affected leg than did mice that were given morphine. In some cases, the time that a mouse treated with anti-NGF spent favoring its affected leg was half that of a mouse treated with morphine.

This suggests that anti-NGF therapy may be effective in reducing pain, thereby helping to enhance the quality of life in patients with bone pain caused by prostate cancer.

All of the animals were euthanized about two weeks after receiving the first round of ACE-1 injections. At that point, the researchers removed the affected thigh bone from each mouse in order to analyze the bone’s density. Bone density corresponded with the number of tumors in the bone – the denser the bone, the more tumors it had.

Results from the density analysis showed that anti-NGF therapy did not stop prostate cancer from progressing, nor did it decrease bone formation caused by the disease.

Why prostate cancer causes excess bone to form remains a mystery, but having the ACE-1 model may help researchers learn why it happens.

“Bone is often the only clinically detectable site of the spread of prostate cancer,” Rosol said. “Understanding why this happens is not only important for cancer patients, but also for scientists who are trying to understand how bone responds to different biochemical factors.”

Rosol conducted the study with researchers from the University of Minnesota; the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Minneapolis; and with Rinat Neuroscience Corporation, in Palo Alto, Calif.

This work was supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health, the MinCREST program at the University of Minnesota and a Merit Review from the Veterans Administration.

Thomas Rosol | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ohio-state.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Building a brain, cell by cell: Researchers make a mini neuron network (of two)
23.05.2018 | Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo

nachricht Research reveals how order first appears in liquid crystals
23.05.2018 | Brown University

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: LZH showcases laser material processing of tomorrow at the LASYS 2018

At the LASYS 2018, from June 5th to 7th, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) will be showcasing processes for the laser material processing of tomorrow in hall 4 at stand 4E75. With blown bomb shells the LZH will present first results of a research project on civil security.

At this year's LASYS, the LZH will exhibit light-based processes such as cutting, welding, ablation and structuring as well as additive manufacturing for...

Im Focus: Self-illuminating pixels for a new display generation

There are videos on the internet that can make one marvel at technology. For example, a smartphone is casually bent around the arm or a thin-film display is rolled in all directions and with almost every diameter. From the user's point of view, this looks fantastic. From a professional point of view, however, the question arises: Is that already possible?

At Display Week 2018, scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP will be demonstrating today’s technological possibilities and...

Im Focus: Explanation for puzzling quantum oscillations has been found

So-called quantum many-body scars allow quantum systems to stay out of equilibrium much longer, explaining experiment | Study published in Nature Physics

Recently, researchers from Harvard and MIT succeeded in trapping a record 53 atoms and individually controlling their quantum state, realizing what is called a...

Im Focus: Dozens of binaries from Milky Way's globular clusters could be detectable by LISA

Next-generation gravitational wave detector in space will complement LIGO on Earth

The historic first detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes far outside our galaxy opened a new window to understanding the universe. A...

Im Focus: Entangled atoms shine in unison

A team led by Austrian experimental physicist Rainer Blatt has succeeded in characterizing the quantum entanglement of two spatially separated atoms by observing their light emission. This fundamental demonstration could lead to the development of highly sensitive optical gradiometers for the precise measurement of the gravitational field or the earth's magnetic field.

The age of quantum technology has long been heralded. Decades of research into the quantum world have led to the development of methods that make it possible...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Save the date: Forum European Neuroscience – 07-11 July 2018 in Berlin, Germany

02.05.2018 | Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Research reveals how order first appears in liquid crystals

23.05.2018 | Life Sciences

Space-like gravity weakens biochemical signals in muscle formation

23.05.2018 | Life Sciences

NIST puts the optical microscope under the microscope to achieve atomic accuracy

23.05.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>