Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Einstein scientists discover how protein crucial for motion is synthesised at the right place in the cell

24.11.2005


Researchers at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the German Cancer Research Institute have shown how protein synthesis is targeted to certain regions of a cell--a process crucial for the cellular motility that governs nerve growth, wound healing and cancer metastasis. Their study appears in the November 24 issue of the journal Nature.



Led by Drs. Robert Singer and Dr Stefan Huettelmaier, the research team focused on migrating fibroblast cells important in wound healing. To move towards a wound, these cells manufacture the protein actin, which polymerizes into long filaments that push the cell’s membrane outward to form protrusions.

The team’s previous work showed how newly formed actin messenger RNA molecules find their way to the cell’s periphery: A protein called ZBP1 binds to the messenger RNA and "escorts" it out of the fibroblast nucleus and into the cytoplasm. On reaching the cell’s periphery, the messenger RNA is translated into actin protein responsible for cell motility.


This new study reveals another key role for ZBP1: Not only does ZBP1 bind to actin messenger RNA and guide it to the cell’s periphery, but it also helps regulate where in the cell the messenger RNA is translated into actin.

"The ZBP1 bound to actin’s messenger RNA acts like a lock to prevent it from being translated into protein before reaching its destination," explains Dr. Singer. "On arriving at the cell periphery, the messenger RNA/ZBP1 complex encounters an enzyme, the protein kinase Src, which is active only in that part of the cell. Src adds a phosphate group to ZBP1 close to where it binds to messenger RNA, and this phosphorylation reaction detaches ZBP1 from the actin messenger RNA--unlocking the messenger RNA so it can now be translated into the actin protein that makes cell movement possible."

Understanding how actin synthesis is spatially regulated in motile cells could lead to new cancer therapies. "In cancer," says Dr. Singer, "we know that expression of ZBP1 correlates with benign tumors, while suppression of ZBP1 is associated with metastasis--when motile cancer cells break off from the primary tumor and invade other areas of the body. So a drug that could force tumor cells to express ZBP1 might prevent cancers from spreading."

In addition to Dr. Singer, other Einstein researchers involved in the study are Dr. John Condeelis, professor and co-chair with Dr. Singer of Einstein’s Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Daniel Zenklusen, Mike Lorenz, XiuHua Meng, and Jason Dictenberg of that department, Gary J. Bassell of the Department of Neuroscience at Einstein, and Dr. Marcell Lederer, now in Dr. Huettelmaier’s laboratory of Martin-Luther-University of Halle, Germany.

Karen Gardner | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.aecom.yu.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Discovery of a Key Regulatory Gene in Cardiac Valve Formation
24.05.2017 | Universität Basel

nachricht Carcinogenic soot particles from GDI engines
24.05.2017 | Empa - Eidgenössische Materialprüfungs- und Forschungsanstalt

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Physicists discover mechanism behind granular capillary effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Measured for the first time: Direction of light waves changed by quantum effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>