Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Human beta-cell line offers hope for type 1 diabetes breakthrough

27.09.2005


Transplantation of insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cells shows great promise as a treatment for type 1 diabetes, but development of this therapy has been hampered by a severe shortage of donor beta-cells, which are obtained from decreased human donors. In research published in the October issue of Nature Biotechnology, Ji-Won Yoon, PhD, Professor of Pathology and Director of the Rosalind Franklin Comprehensive Diabetes Center at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, Dr. Naoya Kobayashi (Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine and Dentistry), and their international colleagues describe a "reversibly immortalized" cell line that can supply large amounts of insulin-producing human beta-cells. Ultimately, a cell line of this sort may provide an abundant source of beta-cells for transplantation and an alternative to beta-cells from cadavers.



Type 1 diabetes results from the loss of insulin-producing beta-cells in the pancreas. Because the supply of beta-cells from cadavers is insufficient to meet the needs of 99% of diabetic patients, alternative sources of beta-cells would be highly desirable. Previous efforts to coax mature human beta-cells to survive and replicate in the laboratory have not succeeded, however, because the cells died or lost their ability to produce insulin in response to sugar stimulation.

Dr. Yoon, Dr. Kobayashi and colleagues got around this problem by manipulating and analyzing large numbers of human beta-cells. First, they added genes that extend cell lifespan to human beta-cells and looked for the rare cells that did not form tumors and that expressed insulin or other beta-cell proteins. Out of more than 250 cells lines screened, only one passed this test. This cell line was allowed to replicate to produce large numbers of cells. Then, the genes that extend cell lifespan were removed to ensure that the cells would not form tumors and to promote beta-cell behavior. The resulting cells produced about 40% as much insulin as normal beta-cells and successfully controlled blood sugar levels in diabetic mice for more than 30 weeks.


While further research is needed before these cells can be considered for testing in humans, plans to develop a "universal beta-cell line" are well underway, and Dr. Yoon anticipates that human clinical trials might begin as soon as three to five years from now. The discovery of this technique to create a reversibly immortalized beta-cell line represents a significant leap in the quest to develop an effective and universal treatment for type 1 diabetes; it is estimated that 18.2 million Americans suffer from diabetes. The long-term impact of this discovery, and those that will follow, will undoubtedly be profound and far-reaching.

Kathy Peterson | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.rosalindfranklin.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht 127 at one blow...
18.01.2017 | Stiftung Zoologisches Forschungsmuseum Alexander Koenig, Leibniz-Institut für Biodiversität der Tiere

nachricht How gut bacteria can make us ill
18.01.2017 | Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

Im Focus: How to inflate a hardened concrete shell with a weight of 80 t

At TU Wien, an alternative for resource intensive formwork for the construction of concrete domes was developed. It is now used in a test dome for the Austrian Federal Railways Infrastructure (ÖBB Infrastruktur).

Concrete shells are efficient structures, but not very resource efficient. The formwork for the construction of concrete domes alone requires a high amount of...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

Nothing will happen without batteries making it happen!

05.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Explaining how 2-D materials break at the atomic level

18.01.2017 | Materials Sciences

Data analysis optimizes cyber-physical systems in telecommunications and building automation

18.01.2017 | Information Technology

Reducing household waste with less energy

18.01.2017 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>