Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Tracking membranes of rupturing blood cells sheds light on malaria infection

22.09.2005


By specially tagging the outer and inner membranes of red blood cells infected with the malaria parasite and tracking the cellular changes that precede the cell bursting event that disperses parasites to other blood cells, a group of researchers has deepened our understanding of how the malaria pathogen destroys the cells in which it resides. The work is reported in Current Biology by Joshua Zimmerberg and colleagues at the U.S. National Institutes of Health.



Malaria devastates humanity: Approximately every 10 seconds, another child dies as a result of a malarial infection. Globally, it is the third biggest killer, and it mostly kills children. The emergence of all-drug-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite responsible for most human malarial disease, is a frightening new reality that mandates aggressive research to develop new vaccines and drugs, particularly to uncover new targets for therapeutic agents. A major area of current ignorance is the mechanism by which parasites are released from the infected red blood cells within which they multiply.

To learn more about this release process, in their new work the researchers used high-quality microscopy and a "Nan crystal" fluorescent tag that allowed them to follow the behavior of membranes of infected cells during an extended period of time. The authors discovered that many minutes before release, infected cells look irregular, resembling a fried egg, with the parasites bunched together in the center. They found that just prior to release, cells round up and become very symmetric, resembling a flower, with the parasites (present beneath the cell-membrane surface) appearing like the petals.


The researchers showed that at the seemingly explosive event of release itself, cellular membranes fold upon themselves and bubble into small vesicles, allowing the newly born parasites (in this stage they are called merozoites) to infect neighboring red blood cells. Further experiments involving labeled membrane components showed that there is no membrane fusion during release, but that instead it is likely that a build-up of pressure occurs inside the cell, causing cell-membrane rupture and subsequent merozoite release. This idea was substantiated by experiments showing that shrinking cells to prevent their bursting stopped the release stage and thus stopped the infection from further development.

Heidi Hardman | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.cell.com
http://www.current-biology.com

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Immune Defense Without Collateral Damage
23.01.2017 | Universität Basel

nachricht The interactome of infected neural cells reveals new therapeutic targets for Zika
23.01.2017 | D'Or Institute for Research and Education

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Tracking movement of immune cells identifies key first steps in inflammatory arthritis

23.01.2017 | Health and Medicine

Electrocatalysis can advance green transition

23.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New technology for mass-production of complex molded composite components

23.01.2017 | Process Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>