Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Government Chemist position strengthened in 2004 review

27.07.2005


The latest review of the Government Chemist (GC) presents an account of LGC’s analytical, advisory and strategic work for the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) during 2004. An overview of the year’s achievements, the review shows significant growth in the role of the GC and the subsequent benefits for government, businesses and consumers.



The review focuses on the GC’s three main responsibilities: its statutory referee function to provide evidence to resolve differences arising from analytical measurements made by businesses and regulatory enforcement bodies; its advisory role to government and industry on matters of policy, standards and regulation; and LGC’s analytical and technological capabilities required to support the GC function effectively.

Dr John Marriott, Government Chemist and LGC’s Director of Analytical Technology, said: "It has been a busy year for the Government Chemist. As the referee analyst, we experienced a 79% increase in samples received under food and agriculture legislation, associated with the safety, authenticity or labelling of food products. One of the issues investigated concerned the amount of viable bacteria in probiotic food supplements that led to the product being removed from the market to be reformulated. Other challenges included the identification of irradiated food, the determination of mycotoxins in feeds, and the understanding of the variability in the determination of calcium concentration in fortified soya milk. On the advisory side, we have taken a lead on regulatory guidance for UK businesses during industry preparations for the EU’s REACH chemical testing scheme."


He continued: "It is particularly pleasing to see the GC role continue to evolve and grow year on year and to know that our responsibilities work to the benefit of all sides. Whether we are reporting results of complex chemical analysis or advising on issues relating to anything from consumer safety to human exposure to chemicals in the environment, we know that we are working in the interests of regulators, industry and consumers."

The review also reports on a new three-year Government Chemist programme to 2008, agreed with DTI and formulated with input from national stakeholders having a vested interest in analysis. The new programme will respond to anticipated sustained pressures on the referee analyst stemming from the redoubled surveillance of food products as a result of recent health alerts such as Sudan 1. It will work towards building public confidence over the objectivity and value of government science and will underpin the statutory duties of the Government Chemist, spurring on further innovation to push the boundaries of regulatory measurement science.

The Government Chemist Review 2004 is available at www.lgc.co.uk/docgallery/429.pdf. Printed copies are available from LGC, Queens Road, Teddington, Middlesex, TW11 0LY. Tel: 020 8943 7000. Fax: 020 8943 2767. Email: info@lgc.co.uk.

Wendy Taylor | alfa
Further information:
http://www.lgc.co.uk

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Scientists spin artificial silk from whey protein
24.01.2017 | Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY

nachricht Choreographing the microRNA-target dance
24.01.2017 | UT Southwestern Medical Center

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Scientists spin artificial silk from whey protein

X-ray study throws light on key process for production

A Swedish-German team of researchers has cleared up a key process for the artificial production of silk. With the help of the intense X-rays from DESY's...

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Breaking the optical bandwidth record of stable pulsed lasers

24.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Choreographing the microRNA-target dance

24.01.2017 | Life Sciences

Spanish scientists create a 3-D bioprinter to print human skin

24.01.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>