Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Government Chemist position strengthened in 2004 review


The latest review of the Government Chemist (GC) presents an account of LGC’s analytical, advisory and strategic work for the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) during 2004. An overview of the year’s achievements, the review shows significant growth in the role of the GC and the subsequent benefits for government, businesses and consumers.

The review focuses on the GC’s three main responsibilities: its statutory referee function to provide evidence to resolve differences arising from analytical measurements made by businesses and regulatory enforcement bodies; its advisory role to government and industry on matters of policy, standards and regulation; and LGC’s analytical and technological capabilities required to support the GC function effectively.

Dr John Marriott, Government Chemist and LGC’s Director of Analytical Technology, said: "It has been a busy year for the Government Chemist. As the referee analyst, we experienced a 79% increase in samples received under food and agriculture legislation, associated with the safety, authenticity or labelling of food products. One of the issues investigated concerned the amount of viable bacteria in probiotic food supplements that led to the product being removed from the market to be reformulated. Other challenges included the identification of irradiated food, the determination of mycotoxins in feeds, and the understanding of the variability in the determination of calcium concentration in fortified soya milk. On the advisory side, we have taken a lead on regulatory guidance for UK businesses during industry preparations for the EU’s REACH chemical testing scheme."

He continued: "It is particularly pleasing to see the GC role continue to evolve and grow year on year and to know that our responsibilities work to the benefit of all sides. Whether we are reporting results of complex chemical analysis or advising on issues relating to anything from consumer safety to human exposure to chemicals in the environment, we know that we are working in the interests of regulators, industry and consumers."

The review also reports on a new three-year Government Chemist programme to 2008, agreed with DTI and formulated with input from national stakeholders having a vested interest in analysis. The new programme will respond to anticipated sustained pressures on the referee analyst stemming from the redoubled surveillance of food products as a result of recent health alerts such as Sudan 1. It will work towards building public confidence over the objectivity and value of government science and will underpin the statutory duties of the Government Chemist, spurring on further innovation to push the boundaries of regulatory measurement science.

The Government Chemist Review 2004 is available at Printed copies are available from LGC, Queens Road, Teddington, Middlesex, TW11 0LY. Tel: 020 8943 7000. Fax: 020 8943 2767. Email:

Wendy Taylor | alfa
Further information:

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Molecular doorstop could be key to new tuberculosis drugs
20.03.2018 | Rockefeller University

nachricht Modified biomaterials self-assemble on temperature cues
20.03.2018 | Duke University

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Mars' oceans formed early, possibly aided by massive volcanic eruptions

Oceans formed before Tharsis and evolved together, shaping climate history of Mars

A new scenario seeking to explain how Mars' putative oceans came and went over the last 4 billion years implies that the oceans formed several hundred million...

Im Focus: Tiny implants for cells are functional in vivo

For the first time, an interdisciplinary team from the University of Basel has succeeded in integrating artificial organelles into the cells of live zebrafish embryos. This innovative approach using artificial organelles as cellular implants offers new potential in treating a range of diseases, as the authors report in an article published in Nature Communications.

In the cells of higher organisms, organelles such as the nucleus or mitochondria perform a range of complex functions necessary for life. In the networks of...

Im Focus: Locomotion control with photopigments

Researchers from Göttingen University discover additional function of opsins

Animal photoreceptors capture light with photopigments. Researchers from the University of Göttingen have now discovered that these photopigments fulfill an...

Im Focus: Surveying the Arctic: Tracking down carbon particles

Researchers embark on aerial campaign over Northeast Greenland

On 15 March, the AWI research aeroplane Polar 5 will depart for Greenland. Concentrating on the furthest northeast region of the island, an international team...

Im Focus: Unique Insights into the Antarctic Ice Shelf System

Data collected on ocean-ice interactions in the little-researched regions of the far south

The world’s second-largest ice shelf was the destination for a Polarstern expedition that ended in Punta Arenas, Chile on 14th March 2018. Oceanographers from...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Industry & Economy
Event News

Virtual reality conference comes to Reutlingen

19.03.2018 | Event News

Ultrafast Wireless and Chip Design at the DATE Conference in Dresden

16.03.2018 | Event News

International Tinnitus Conference of the Tinnitus Research Initiative in Regensburg

13.03.2018 | Event News

Latest News

Physicists made crystal lattice from polaritons

20.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Mars' oceans formed early, possibly aided by massive volcanic eruptions

20.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Thawing permafrost produces more methane than expected

20.03.2018 | Earth Sciences

Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>