Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Sneaky sex causes fish pest

14.07.2005


Men! Fed up with women faking headaches? Grant yourself lucky that you are not a mosquito fish, as females wouldn’t think twice about attacking you when you make a pass at them. As they are not keen on intercourse, females select for strong male genes by attacking those that show them some interest. Therefore, the lucky (it’s often the little) one sneaks up from behind, quickly retracting after copulation to prevent a nasty blast.

All sexual activity among mosquito fish relies on male coercion, which depends on environmental temperatures. Dr. Robbie Wilson from the University of Queensland, Australia, will present his work at the Society for Experimental Biology Annual Main Meeting in Barcelona, on Thursday 14th July [session A9] where he will reveal that female “willingness” is influenced by the temperature of their environment, i.e. at higher temperatures, they are more likely to linger around males before swimming off.

Unlike most other fish species, male mosquito fish possess a penis-like organ (gonopodium), fertilising the eggs inside the female body. Male mosquito fish can reproduce over a temperature range of 14-38ºC, but can only produce young at temperatures from 20ºC upwards. Females therefore carry sperm until a suitable temperature arises for fertilisation. Research showed that male fish are adapted to their environmental temperatures; some “perform” better in colder, others in warmer environments. Short-term adjustments to their muscle structure and function enables them to respond to different temperatures.



Mosquito fish were introduced from the south-east of America into Asia, Australia, Mediterranean Europe and Northern Africa by the WHO to control mosquito populations in the 1920’s. Currently, these fish have overgrown local fish populations and are damaging the Australian native fish and frog populations, as they eat tadpoles and young fish. Research into reproductive habits will help explain how to take measures in decreasing their population.

Diana van Gent | alfa
Further information:
http://www.sebiology.org/vcsearch.asp

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Cells communicate in a dynamic code
19.02.2018 | California Institute of Technology

nachricht Studying mitosis' structure to understand the inside of cancer cells
19.02.2018 | Biophysical Society

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Contacting the molecular world through graphene nanoribbons

19.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

When Proteins Shake Hands

19.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

Cells communicate in a dynamic code

19.02.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>