Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Anti-AIDS Drug Becomes Ten Times Less Toxic

17.06.2005


Outstanding antiviral action of multiple antibiotics remains unclaimed due to high drug toxicity. Russian physicians are trying to get nontoxic drug dosage form and have achieved success as regards to anit-AIDS antibiotic – Heliomycinum. Their effort has been funded by the International Science and Technology Center.



Specialists of the Lomonosov Moscow State Academy of Fine Applied Chemistry and Ivanovsky Scientific Research Institute of Virology (Russian Academy of Medical Sciences) have found the way to reduce by ten times toxicity of anit-AIDS antibiotic Heliomycinum (Resistomycinum). To this end, antibiotic was enclosed into an adipose (lipidic) bubble - liposome.

Utilization of liposomes as a carrier of drugs is increasingly attracts attention of researchers. Liposomes are non-toxic and get fully decomposed in the organism. As lipids’ disintegration occurs gradually, the drug enclosed in liposome is also released in small doses, thus allowing to create drugs with durable action and to reduce their toxicity.


Heliomycinum is one of the drugs whose toxicity the researchers are eager to reduce. This antibiotic blocks the action of several specific enzymes of human immunodeficiency virus, therefore, it has been considered a promising antiviral drug for a long time. However, Heliomycinum has not been widely accepted in medicine due to very poor solubility in water and high toxicity. Heliomycinum inclusion into liposomes would improve the drug quality and allow to create its injection form of low toxicity.

To obtain a liposomic drug, the researchers added the Heliomycinum solution in the chloroform and methanol mixture to the lipidic film. Samples were frozen in liquid nitrogen and stirred up at room temperature. The freezing/thawing cycle was repeated for five more times. As a result, antibiotic embedded into the lipidic film. Then, the mixture was forced through the filters with small interstices to separate non-bound Heliomycinum, and the medicinal mixture itself was smashed to small bubbles containing known concentration of antibiotic. The researchers sorted out such lipid composition that up to 97 percent of Heliomycinum is included into liposomes. Having hidden Heliomycinum into liposomes, the researchers succeeded to dissolve it in physiological solution, which is important for pharmaceutical purposes.

The liposome drug toxicity was tried on the culture of embryonic fibroblasts. Heliomycinum in aqueous solution destroyed every single cell already within 24 hours, and toxicity of liposomic form turned out to be ten times lower. Antiviral activity of liposomic Heliomycinum was tried on the culture of fibroblasts which were infected by cytomegalovirus. This human virus does not cause diseases and ideally fits for model experiments. A new drug has turned out to be active against virus, the drug being applied in such concentration that it is non-toxic for cells.

Sergey Komarov | alfa
Further information:
http://www.informnauka.ru

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Flow of cerebrospinal fluid regulates neural stem cell division
22.05.2018 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

nachricht Chemists at FAU successfully demonstrate imine hydrogenation with inexpensive main group metal
22.05.2018 | Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Explanation for puzzling quantum oscillations has been found

So-called quantum many-body scars allow quantum systems to stay out of equilibrium much longer, explaining experiment | Study published in Nature Physics

Recently, researchers from Harvard and MIT succeeded in trapping a record 53 atoms and individually controlling their quantum state, realizing what is called a...

Im Focus: Dozens of binaries from Milky Way's globular clusters could be detectable by LISA

Next-generation gravitational wave detector in space will complement LIGO on Earth

The historic first detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes far outside our galaxy opened a new window to understanding the universe. A...

Im Focus: Entangled atoms shine in unison

A team led by Austrian experimental physicist Rainer Blatt has succeeded in characterizing the quantum entanglement of two spatially separated atoms by observing their light emission. This fundamental demonstration could lead to the development of highly sensitive optical gradiometers for the precise measurement of the gravitational field or the earth's magnetic field.

The age of quantum technology has long been heralded. Decades of research into the quantum world have led to the development of methods that make it possible...

Im Focus: Computer-Designed Customized Regenerative Heart Valves

Cardiovascular tissue engineering aims to treat heart disease with prostheses that grow and regenerate. Now, researchers from the University of Zurich, the Technical University Eindhoven and the Charité Berlin have successfully implanted regenerative heart valves, designed with the aid of computer simulations, into sheep for the first time.

Producing living tissue or organs based on human cells is one of the main research fields in regenerative medicine. Tissue engineering, which involves growing...

Im Focus: Light-induced superconductivity under high pressure

A team of scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg investigated optically-induced superconductivity in the alkali-doped fulleride K3C60under high external pressures. This study allowed, on one hand, to uniquely assess the nature of the transient state as a superconducting phase. In addition, it unveiled the possibility to induce superconductivity in K3C60 at temperatures far above the -170 degrees Celsius hypothesized previously, and rather all the way to room temperature. The paper by Cantaluppi et al has been published in Nature Physics.

Unlike ordinary metals, superconductors have the unique capability of transporting electrical currents without any loss. Nowadays, their technological...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Save the date: Forum European Neuroscience – 07-11 July 2018 in Berlin, Germany

02.05.2018 | Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Supersonic waves may help electronics beat the heat

18.05.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Keeping a Close Eye on Ice Loss

18.05.2018 | Information Technology

CrowdWater: An App for Flood Research

18.05.2018 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>