Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Public release of pig genomic sequences

07.06.2005


Beijing Genomics Institute (BGI) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and the Danish Committee of Pig Breeding and Production (DCPBP) jointly announce the public release of pig genomic sequences. The released sequence data include 3.84 million pieces of the genomes of five different domestic pig breeds from Europe and China. The data are generated from the first large scale pig genome sequencing effort, the Sino-Danish Pig Genome Project, started in 2001 on the basis of a long standing collaboration of scientists and research institutions from China and Denmark.



An open access research article from the Sino-Danish Pig Genome Project can be found at: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/6/70 and the genome sequence data are immediately accessible from the NCBI Trace Repository (Center name: "SDJVP"; Project name: "Sino-Danish Pig Genome Project") and GenBank, a public DNA sequence database of the US National Institutes of Health.

In addition to the genome survey, 100 libraries of expressed sequences from different pig tissues and developmental stages have been analyzed. These sequences will be released in the near future together with a publication on pig gene expression.


This far, the pig sequence data have been obtained thanks to an investment of app. 10 million US$ by CAS and DCPBP together with the Ministry of Science and Technology and the Natural Science Foundation of China.

The research indicates that pig is genetically closer to man than normally used laboratory animals. This has important implications for the use of pigs in medical research and drug testing. Thus, the availability of the pig sequence data will allow other public and private researchers to identify many important aspects relating to biomedical research as well as to production, food safety and animal health traits that will greatly benefit health care, industry and consumers.

The Sino-Danish Pig Genome Project has been one of the best examples of international scientific collaboration, which puts its emphasis on issues of wider importance. The endeavour will be incorporated into the next stage of the pig genome project in which a draft sequence map of 6 fold genome coverage will be produced. This effort will be coordinated by the international Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium (SGSC) led by scientists from USA and UK. A simultaneous announcement will also be made by SGSC and the Alliance for Animal Genome Research (AAGR) in support of this public release.

DCTBP represents the world leading Danish pig breeders and global exporters of pig products. Denmark, with a population of only 5.4 million people, produces app. 25 million pigs per year.

BGI is a leading genomics research institution in the promotion of genomics in agricultural research. In the past 5 years, in addition to its contribution to the international Human Genome and HapMap Projects, BGI has sequenced the genomes of rice, chicken, silkworm, and many microorganisms of importance for agriculture, environment, and infectious diseases. BGI will continue its efforts in pig genome research through its support to and participation in SGSC.

Bin Liu, PhD | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.genomics.org.cn

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Cells communicate in a dynamic code
19.02.2018 | California Institute of Technology

nachricht Studying mitosis' structure to understand the inside of cancer cells
19.02.2018 | Biophysical Society

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Contacting the molecular world through graphene nanoribbons

19.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

When Proteins Shake Hands

19.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

Cells communicate in a dynamic code

19.02.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>