Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Immune-System Cells May Promote Chronic Infections

03.06.2005


Cells sent to fight infections in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients actually enhance the development of permanent bacterial infections, according to researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center. Infections with the bacteria Pseudomonas are a major cause of sickness and death in cystic fibrosis patients. The findings, published in the June issue of Infection and Immunity, suggest new treatment strategies for patients with cystic fibrosis.



"Pseudomonas can use the remnants of dead white blood cells to develop a protective biofilm, which helps the bacteria establish a permanent infection," said National Jewish pulmonologist Jerry Nick, M.D., senior author on the paper. "So, ironically, the very cells sent to fight infection may contribute to our inability to eradicate the Pseudomonas infection in cystic fibrosis patients."

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disorder affecting about 30,000 people in the United States, and is the most common genetic disorder among Caucasian people. People with CF produce abnormal mucus that obstructs the airways and leads to chronic lung infections. The disease is fatal, but life expectancy for patients has increased dramatically in recent years, from 14 years in the mid-1980s to 35 years today. National Jewish has one of the largest adult cystic fibrosis clinics in the nation.


Pseudomonas aeruginosa is widespread in the environment and repeatedly infects most CF patients. Aggressive treatment with antibiotics successfully fights most initial infections. Over time, however, P. aeruginosa infections often become permanent; more than 80% of adults with CF are chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. The chronic infection and inflammation associated with P. aeruginosa accelerate damage to the lungs, leading ultimately to respiratory failure and death.

Researchers believe that Pseudomonas establishes a chronic infection in the airway of CF patients by creating a biofilm, a three-dimensional structure composed of bacteria encased in an extracellular matrix. Other examples of bacterial biofilms include the plaque that forms on teeth and the "slime" that forms on rocks in a stream. Bacteria in biofilms take on distinctly different characteristics from those floating free in a "planktonic" form. Once Pseudomonas develops a biofilm it becomes significantly more resistant to both antibiotics and the immune system.

The immune system attempts to eradicate Pseudomonas by sending in massive numbers of cells called neutrophils. The short-lived cells die after a short time and cellular debris accumulate in the airway of CF patients.

In a series of experiments with neutrophils and Pseudomonas, Dr. Nick and his colleagues found that the contents of dead neutrophils, particularly DNA and a filament called actin, provide a scaffolding for Pseudomonas to construct a biofilm. In the presence of neutrophils, the development of P. aeruginosa biofilms increased by two and a half to three times compared to P. aeruginosa cultures without neutrophils.

"As the neutrophils die and fall apart, their contents provide an excellent substrate for the development of biofilms," said Nick. "In turn these biofilms allow Pseudomonas to survive despite intense medical treatment."

The researchers also found that an enzyme known as DNase, which breaks apart strands of DNA, inhibits the development of biofilms. DNase is already used to break up the thick mucus that develops in the lungs of CF patients. Nick believes that it might also be useful in preventing the development of Pseudomonas biofilms.

"Once the biofilm develops, Pseudomonas infections become almost impossible to eradicate," said Nick. "If we could prevent the development of these biofilms, with DNase or other treatments, we could possibly prevent chronic infections, reduce damage to the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients, and extend their lives."

Dr. Nick and his group are now using genomic analysis to better understand how the presence of neutrophils changes the response of Pseudomonas. They hope to discover mechanisms Pseudomonas uses to avoid eradication by the immune system, which could suggest new therapies to prevent Pseudomonas infections from developing in CF patients.

William Allstetter | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.njc.org

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Transforming plant cells from generalists to specialists
07.12.2016 | Duke University

nachricht What happens in the cell nucleus after fertilization
06.12.2016 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Significantly more productivity in USP lasers

In recent years, lasers with ultrashort pulses (USP) down to the femtosecond range have become established on an industrial scale. They could advance some applications with the much-lauded “cold ablation” – if that meant they would then achieve more throughput. A new generation of process engineering that will address this issue in particular will be discussed at the “4th UKP Workshop – Ultrafast Laser Technology” in April 2017.

Even back in the 1990s, scientists were comparing materials processing with nanosecond, picosecond and femtosesecond pulses. The result was surprising:...

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Predicting unpredictability: Information theory offers new way to read ice cores

07.12.2016 | Earth Sciences

Sea ice hit record lows in November

07.12.2016 | Earth Sciences

New material could lead to erasable and rewriteable optical chips

07.12.2016 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>